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Public Information Officer, Oklahoma-Texas Water Science Center

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Hurricane Harvey made landfall near Rockport, Texas on August 25 as a category 4 hurricane with wind gusts exceeding 150 miles per hour. As Harvey moved inland the forward motion of the storm slowed down and produced tremendous rainfall amounts to southeastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana. Historic flooding occurred in Texas and Louisiana as a result of the widespread, heavy rainfall over an 8-day period in Louisiana in August and September 2017. Following the storm event, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hydrographers recovered and documented 2,123 high-water marks in Texas, noting location and height of the water above land surface. Many of these high-water marks were used to create flood-inundation maps for...
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This part of the Data Release contains the raster representation of the water-level altitude and water-level change maps developed every 5 years from 1980-2015 for the upper Rio Grande Focus Area Study. The input point data used to generate the water-level altitude maps can be found in the "Groundwater level measurement data used to develop water-level altitude maps in the upper Rio Grande Alluvial Basins" child item of this data release. These digital data accompany Houston, N.A., Thomas, J.V., Foster, L.K., Pedraza, D.E., and Welborn, T.L., 2020, Hydrogeologic framework, groundwater-level altitudes, groundwater-level changes, and groundwater-storage changes in selected alluvial basins of the upper Rio Grande...
Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Abiquiu Reservoir, Ahumada, Alamosa, Alamosa County, Alamosa Creek, All tags...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Harris‐Galveston Subsidence District, City of Houston, Fort Bend Subsidence District, and Lone Star Groundwater Conservation District has produced this dataset of groundwater‐level altitudes and groundwater‐level altitude changes in the Chicot, Evangeline, and Jasper aquifers in the Houston‐Galveston region, Texas. This dataset shows current‐year (2018) groundwater‐level altitudes for each aquifer, 5‐year (2013‐18) groundwater‐level changes for each aquifer, long‐term (1990‐2018 and 1977‐2018) groundwater‐level changes for the Chicot and Evangeline aquifers, and long‐term (2000‐2018) groundwater‐level change for the Jasper aquifer. The groundwater‐level measurements...
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Sediment samples and samples for water-toxicity testing were collected during 2014 from several streams in San Antonio, Texas known locally as the Westside creeks (Alazán, Apache, Martínez, and San Pedro Creeks) and from the San Antonio River. Samples were collected once during base-flow and again after periods of storm-water runoff (post-storm conditions) to determine baseline sediment- and water-quality conditions. Streambed-sediment samples were analyzed for selected constituents, including trace elements and organic contaminants such as pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated flame retardants, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).
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In cooperation with Dallas Water Utilities (DWU), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measures nutrient and major-ion concentrations in selected reservoirs in north Texas. This data release documents water-quality data obtained from Ray Hubbard Lake, Grapevine Lake, Ray Roberts Lake, and Lake Lewisville during water years 2016-19. In addition to nutrient and major-ion concentrations, water-quality field properties and other selected constituents measured in the water-quality samples collected from these reservoirs are documented. The study began in water year 2016 (WY16) with monthly sampling of Ray Hubbard Lake. A water year is defined as the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated...
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