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Pete Dartnell

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This part of DS 781 presents data for bathymetry for several seafloor maps of the Offshore of Point Conception Map Area, California. The vector data file is included in "BathymetryHS_OffshorePointConception.zip," which is accessible from https://doi.org/10.5066/F7QN64XQ. Shaded-relief bathymetry of the Offshore of Point Conception map area in southern California was generated largely from acoustic-bathymetry data collected by Fugro Pelagos Inc. Acoustic mapping was completed in 2008 using a combination of 400-kHz Reson 7125, 240-kHz Reson 8101, and 100-kHz Reson 8111 multibeam echosounders. Bathymetric-lidar data was collected in the nearshore area by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Joint Lidar Bathymetry...
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Hyperpycnal gravity currents rapidly transport sediment across shore from rivers to the continental shelf and deep sea. Although these geophysical processes are important sediment dispersal mechanisms, few distinct geomorphic features on the continental shelf can be attributed to hyperpycnal flows. Here we provide evidence of large depositional features derived from hyperpycnal plumes on the continental shelf of the northern Santa Barbara Channel, California, from the combination of new sonar, lidar, and seismic reflection data. These data reveal lobate fans directly offshore of the mouths of several watersheds known to produce hyperpycnal concentrations of suspended sediment. The fans occur on an upwardly concave...
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Geologic maps that span the shoreline and include both onshore and offshore areas are potentially valuable tools that can lead to a more in depth understanding of coastal environments. Such maps can contribute to the understanding of shoreline change, geologic hazards, both offshore and along-shore sediment and pollutant transport. They are also useful in assessing geologic and biologic resources. Several intermediate-scale (1:100,000) geologic maps that include both onshore and offshore areas (herein called onshore-offshore geologic maps) have been produced of areas along the California coast (see Saucedo and others, 2003; Kennedy and others, 2007; Kennedy and Tan, 2008), but few large-scale (1:24,000) maps have...
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In April 2004, more than 40 hours of georeferenced submarine digital video was collected in water depths of 15-370 m in Glacier Bay to (1) ground-truth existing geophysical data (bathymetry and acoustic reflectance), (2) examine and record geologic characteristics of the sea floor, and (3) investigate the relation between substrate types and benthic communities, and (4) construct predictive maps of seafloor geomorphology and habitat distribution. Common substrates observed include rock, boulders, cobbles, rippled sand, bioturbated mud, and extensive beds of living horse mussels and scallops. Four principal sea-floor geomorphic types are distinguished by using video observations. Their distribution in lower and central...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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This part of DS 781 presents data for bathymetry for several seafloor maps of the Offshore of Point Conception Map Area, California. The GeoTiff is included in "Bathymetry_OffshorePointConception.zip," which is accessible from https://doi.org/10.5066/F7QN64XQ. Bathymetry map of the Offshore of Point Conception map area in southern California was generated largely from acoustic-bathymetry data collected by Fugro Pelagos Inc. Acoustic mapping was completed in 2008 using a combination of 400-kHz Reson 7125, 240-kHz Reson 8101, and 100-kHz Reson 8111 multibeam echosounders. Bathymetric-lidar data was collected in the nearshore area by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Joint Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of...
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