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Paul D. Capel

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All of the rain samples during the growing season had detectable quantities of at least one pesticide, but most of the pesticides were only infrequently observed. The most frequently detected compounds were the herbicides alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor, and in 1994, its first year of registration, acetochlor. Peak concentrations of most herbicides in rainfall occurred shortly after their application periods in the spring. Peak concentrations of most of the insecticides occurred later in the summer. The majority of the wet depositional flux of pesticides occurred between early May and October. The annual wet depositional flux of pesticides is 5 orders of magnitude less than is the "annual flux" normally...
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The sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) to ??-Al2O3 was investigated with a headspace analysis method. The semiautomated headspace analyzer gave rapid, precise, and accurate results for a homologous series alkylbenzenes even at low percentages of solute mass sorbed (3-50%). Sorption experiments carried out with benzene alone indicated weak interactions with well-characterized aluminum oxide, and a solids concentration effect was observed. When the sorption coefficients for benzene alone obtained by headspace analysis were extrapolated up to the solids concentrations typically used in batch sorption experiments, the measured sorption coefficients agreed with reported sorption coefficients for HOCs and...
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This USGS Data Release represents the data used to develop multiple linear regression models for estimating the loads of total nitrogen in small streams. Recursive partitioning and random forest regression were used to assess 85 geospatial, environmental, and watershed variables across 636 small (less than 585 square kilometers) watersheds to determine which variables are fundamentally important to the estimation of annual loads of total nitrogen. These data support the following publication: Kronholm, S.C., Capel, P.D., and Terziotti, Silvia, 2016, Statistically extracted fundamental watershed variables for estimating the loads of total nitrogen in small streams: Environmental Modeling and Assessment, 10 p., http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10666-016-9525-3.
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Sorption experiments were conducted with naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene on low organic carbon sediments at 4 and 26 °C using batch and column techniques. Experimental controls ensured the absence of biologic and photolytic activity and colloid-free solution supernatants. Equilibrium distribution coefficients (Kd) increased 1.1−1.6 times with a decrease in temperature of 22 °C. Fraction instantaneous sorption (F) values did not change significantly with a decrease in temperature of 22 °C. Desorption rate constants (k2) decreased 1.2−2.6 times with a decrease in temperature of 22 °C. Times to equilibrium were at least 40 h. The magnitude of observed Kd and k2 values and the effect of temperature on Kd (e.g.,...
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Mixing models are a commonly used method for hydrograph separation, but can be hindered by the subjective choice of the end-member tracer concentrations. This work tests a new variant of mixing model that uses high-frequency measures of two tracers and streamflow to separate total streamflow into water from slowflow and fastflow sources. The ratio between the concentrations of the two tracers is used to create a time-variable estimate of the concentration of each tracer in the fastflow end-member. Multiple synthetic data sets, and data from two hydrologically diverse streams, are used to test the performance and limitations of the new model (two-tracer ratio-based mixing model: TRaMM). When applied to the synthetic...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Water Resources Research
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