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Pacific Island CASC

Almost all daily rainfall time series contain gaps in the instrumental record. Various methods can be used to fill in missing data using observations at neighboring sites (predictor stations). In this study, five computationally simple gap-filling approaches—normal ratio (NR), linear regression (LR), inverse distance weighting (ID), quantile mapping (QM), and single best estimator (BE)—are evaluated to 1) determine the optimal method for gap filling daily rainfall in Hawaii, 2) quantify the error associated with filling gaps of various size, and 3) determine the value of gap filling prior to spatial interpolation. Results show that the correlation between a target station and a predictor station is more important...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
With increasing needs for understanding historic climatic events and assessing changes in extreme weather to support natural hazard planning and infrastructure design, it is vital to have an accurate long-term hourly rainfall dataset. In Hawaiʻi, annual, monthly, and daily gauge data have been well-compiled and are accessible. Here, we compiled hourly rainfall data from both gauges and radars. We arranged the metadata from various data sources, acquired data, and applied quality control to each gauge dataset. In addition, we compiled and provided hourly radar rainfall, and filtered out areas with low confidence (larger error). This paper provides (1) a summary of available hourly data from various observation networks,...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
Globally, invasive plant-fueled wildfires have tremendous environmental, economical, and societal impacts, and the frequencies of wildfires and plant invasions are on an upward trend globally. Identifying which plant species tend to increase the frequency or severity of wildfire is important to help manage their impacts. We developed a screening system to identify introduced plant species that are likely to increase wildfire risk, using the Hawaiian Islands to test the system and illustrate how the system can be applied to inform management decisions. Expert-based fire risk scores derived from field experiences with 49 invasive species in Hawai′i were used to train a machine learning model that predicts expert fire...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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The Pacific Islands CASC aims to provide capacity building opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, post-docs, and early career professionals across the region. Direct participation on PI-CASC co-produced research projects will help them gain invaluable experience to prepare for future careers in research, resource managment, and policy, and help to enhance future professional workforce capacity in their own Pacific communities. Our current programs are: UH Manoa Graduate Scholars This program provides full funding opportunities to graduate students whose research reflects DOI, USGS, and PI-CASC priorities on climate science in the region. The students will also have professional development opportunities...
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Assessments that incorporate areas from land-to-ocean, or “ridge-to-reef", are critical to examine how land-use practices are altering stream discharge and nearshore marine health and productivity. Stream systems in both Alaska and Hawaiʻi are expected to experience changes in water quality associated with changing environmental conditions and increased human-use. Watershed systems throughout the Hawaiian Islands are currently experiencing impacts from climate change that affect groundwater recharge and surface runoff, erosion, and total streamflow, and cause degradation of nearshore marine habitats. This study can provide useful insight for both Alaska and Hawaiʻi by providing resources on how patterns in stream...
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