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P. Ryan Jackson

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In 2016, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Geological Survey, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers undertook a large-scale interagency field study to determine the influence of commercial barge vessels on the efficacy of the Electric Dispersal Barrier System (EDBS) in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) in preventing fish passage. This study included a series of trials in which a tow, consisting of a tug vessel and six fully-loaded barges, transited the EDBS in both upstream-bound (n = 23) and downstream-bound (n = 22) directions. A 3,000 kHz SonTek Argonaut SW Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meter (ADVM) was mounted on the barge at the position of the rake-to-box junction. The ADVM faced outward from the side...
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The State of Illinois' annual withdrawal from Lake Michigan is limited by a U.S. Supreme Court decree, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for monitoring flows in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) near Lemont, Illinois as a part of the Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District. Every 5 years, a technical review committee consisting of practicing engineers and academics is convened to review the U.S. Geological Survey's streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois. The sixth technical review committee raised a number of questions concerning the flows and streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont and this report provides...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for monitoring flows in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) near Lemont, Illinois, as a part of the Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District. Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting is mandated by a U.S. Supreme Court decree in order to monitor, and limit, the State of Illinois’ annual diversion of Great Lakes water through the manmade CSSC. Every 5 years, a technical review committee consisting of practicing engineers and academics reviews USGS streamgaging practices in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois. The sixth technical review committee expressed concern that the index-velocity rating—the method used to...
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These data were collected using a 1200 kHz TRDI Rio Grande acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) in mode 12 with 25 centimeter bins from a moving boat. The data were georeferenced with a Hemisphere Crescent A100 differential Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver with submeter accuracy. The data have been layer-averaged over the lower portion of the water column (0 to 4 meters above the bed). These data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) concurrently with environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling in this reach of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Data were processed using the Velocity Mapping Toolbox (Parsons and others, 2013). NOTE: Any data assigned...
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In 2016, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Geological Survey, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers undertook a large-scale interagency field study to determine the influence of commercial barge vessels on the efficacy of the Electric Dispersal Barrier System (EDBS) in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) in preventing fish passage. This study included a series of trials in which a tow, consisting of a tug vessel and six fully-loaded barges, transited the EDBS in both upstream-bound (n = 23) and downstream-bound (n = 22) directions. A 1,200 kHz Teledyne RDI Channel Master Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meter (ADVM) was mounted on the barge at the position of the rake-to-box junction. The ADVM faced outward from...
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