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Northwest Climate Science Center

For the past six years, the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) has funded the USGS to study fish responses to restoration efforts and to construct a model relating stream habitat with fish population dynamics in the Methow River Basin, a tributary of the Columbia River. In the proposed study, we will use fish growth, distribution and movement (USGS data), foodweb data (Idaho State University), river flow (BOR data that we will expand) and water temperature data (from numerous agencies) to develop spatially-explicit bioenergetics models to assess effects of climate change on the viability of resident salmonid populations based on models being developed by USGS. The bioenergetics models will integrate such things as climate-change...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Alberta, British Columbia, Bull Trout, Climate Change, Climate Change, All tags...
The Klamath Basin in Oregon and California is home to a rich abundance of natural and cultural resources, many of which are vulnerable to present and future climate change. Climate change also threatens traditional ways of life for tribal communities, who have deep connections to the region. This project sought to increase the effectiveness of regional climate change adaptation and planning by (1) developing ways to integrate traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) with western science in decision making, (2) building partnerships between tribal, academic, and government institutions, and (3) increasing future capacity to respond to climate change by engaging tribal youth. Through this project, the Quartz Valley...
A warming climate, fire exclusion, and land cover changes are altering the conditions that produced historical fire regimes and facilitating increased recent wildfire activity in the northwestern United States. Understanding the impacts of changing fire regimes on forest recruitment and succession, species distributions, carbon cycling, and ecosystem services is critical, but challenging across broad spatial scales. One important and understudied aspect of fire regimes is the unburned area within fire perimeters; these areas can function as fire refugia across the landscape during and after wildfire by providing habitat and seed sources. With increasing fire activity, there is speculation that fire intensity and...
The area burned by wildfires has increased in recent decades and is expected to increase in the future for many watersheds worldwide due to climate change. Burned areas within watersheds increase soil erosion rates, which can increase the downstream accumulation of sediment in rivers and reservoirs. Using an ensemble of climate, fire, and erosion models, we show that post-fire sedimentation is projected to increase for more than ¾ of watersheds by at least 10 % and for more than ¼ of watersheds by at least 100 % by the 2041 to 2050 decade in the western USA. In this region, 65 % of the water supply originates from forested lands that are prone to wildfire, and many of the watersheds with projected increases in sedimentation...
The Pacific Region National Wildlife Refuge System developed a strategic approach to identify region-wide land/habitat conservation priorities. This approach was piloted in the Columbia Plateau Ecoregion and resulted in a high-level landscape-scale conservation design. Working closely with conservation partners in the region, we developed a data management and analysis model that builds from existing data sets and can be shared easily with other partners.FY20122012 Objectives: Document a case study on implementing strategic conservation design for the refuge system, which can serve as a model and be applied to other geographic areas Develop a clear picture of landscape scale priorities in the Columbia Plateau, along...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Applications and Tools, Aquatic Connectivity, CA-1, California, California, All tags...
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