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Northeast Climate Science Center

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Freshwater Resilience, Highest and High, Watersheds for Complex and Non-complex Stream Networks, Northeast U.S. is one of a suite of products from the Nature’s Network project (naturesnetwork.org).As growing human populations increase the pace of climate and land use changes, estimating the resilience of freshwater systems will be increasingly important for delivering effective long-term conservation. A region-wide analysis of freshwater stream networks was developed by Mark Anderson and associates at The Nature Conservancy (Anderson et al., 2013) to estimate the capacity of each network to cope with climatic and environmental change. The analysis centered on the evaluation resiliency: characteristics that may...
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This dataset is one of a suite of products from the Nature’s Network project (naturesnetwork.org). Nature’s Network is a collaborative effort to identify shared priorities for conservation in the Northeast, considering the value of fish and wildlife species and the natural areas they inhabit. This dataset represents the relative potential to improve local aquatic connectivity by upgrading road-stream crossings. The model incorporates survey data from the North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative (NAACC). To view the current NAACC database go to https://streamcontinuity.org/database.htm. The Road Stream Crossing Upgrade Effects dataset and other datasets that augment or complement aquatic connectivity are...
This online database (https://www.streamcontinuity.org/cdb2/naacc_search_crossing.cfm) serves as a common repository for road-stream crossing assessment data assembled by the North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative (NAACC). Both a network of partners and a source of shared resources, the NAACC offers a collaborative framework for taking on the critical task of assessing and upgrading the hundreds of thousands of outdated road-stream crossings across the region that represent barriers to wildlife movement and pose flooding risks to communities. The NAACC offers training in standard protocols for conducting assessments, online tools for prioritizing upgrades based on ecological benefits, and this database...
FY2013This project retrieves four years of data from over 200 temperature sensors nested within 28 sites across ~40 million hectares of the hydrographic Great Basin. The sensors span all major aspects and up to 700 m of elevation within sites, and occur in numerous management jurisdictions in 18 mountain ranges plus other areas not in ranges.This project: Quantifies the variability of climate at micro-, meso-, and macroscales across the Basin, and across diel, seasonal, and interannual periods. Informs management and conservation efforts, in terms of helping calibrate and refine the climatic stage upon which all biological actors and efforts hinge (Beier and Brost 2010). Feeds into other bioclimatic and wildlife...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2013, 2014, Academics & scientific researchers, California, California, All tags...
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This project addressed regional climate change effects on aquatic food webs in the Great Lakes. We sought insights by examining Lake Erie as a representative system with a high level of anthropogenic impacts, strong nutrient gradients, seasonal hypoxia, and spatial overlap of cold- and cool-water fish guilds. In Lake Erie and in large embayments throughout the Great Lakes basin, this situation is a concern for fishery managers, as climate change may exacerbate hypoxia and reduce habitat volume for some species. We examined fish community composition, fine-scale distribution, prey availability, diets, and biochemical tracers for dominant fishes from study areas with medium-high nutrient levels (mesotrophic, Fairport...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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