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National Park Service

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High resolution vegetation polygons mapped by the National Park Service. A total of 800 acres (324 ha) were mapped. Thirteen map classes were used to describe the landscape. Among these were six plant association, one alliance, two non-natural map classes (Disturbed, Development), three local types, and one un-vegetated natural class (Open Water).
Tags: Vegetation
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Haleakalā National Park (HALE) was surveyed for landbirds and habitat characteristics from March 20 through July 26, 2012. This information provides data in the time-series of landbird monitoring for long-term trends in forest bird distribution, density, and abundance. The Kīpahulu District of eastern Haleakalā Volcano was surveyed using point-transect distance sampling to estimate bird abundance. We surveyed 160 stations and detected a total of 2,830 birds from 12 species. Half of the species were native and half were non-native. Numbers of detections per species ranged from 1 to 849. There were sufficient detections of seven species to allow density estimation. Āpapane (Himatione sanguinea) was the most widely...
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The National Park Service (NPS) manages the nation's most iconic destinations that attract millions of visitors from across the nation and around the world. Trip-related spending by NPS visitors generates and supports a considerable amount of economic activity within park gateway communities. This economic effects analysis measures how NPS visitor spending cycles through local economies, generating business sales and supporting jobs and income. In 2012, the National Park System received over 282 million recreation visits. NPS visitors spent $14.7 billion in local gateway regions (defined as communities within 60 miles of a park). The contribution of this spending to the national economy was 243 thousand jobs, $9.3...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Natural Resource Report
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High resolution vegetation polygons mapped by the National Park Service. The National Park Service (NPS), in conjunction with the Biological Resources Division (BRD) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), has implemented a program to develop a uniform hierarchical vegetation mapping methodology and classification at a national level and apply it to National Parks. The purpose of the data is to document the state of vegetation on Mt. Wanda at the John Muir National Historic Site during 2004, thereby providing a snapshot of conditions to assist in future monitoring and management. The vegetation units of this map were determined through visual interpretation of aerial photographs supported by field sampling. The vegetation...
Tags: Vegetation
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