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Migratory Bird Management

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Many Arctic shorebird populations are declining, and quantifying adult survival and the effects of anthropogenic factorsis a crucial step toward a better understanding of population dynamics. We used a recently developed, spatially explicitCormack–Jolly–Seber model in a Bayesian framework to obtain broad-scale estimates of true annual survival rates for 6species of shorebirds at 9 breeding sites across the North American Arctic in 2010–2014. We tested for effects ofenvironmental and ecological variables, study site, nest fate, and sex on annual survival rates of each species in thespatially explicit framework, which allowed us to distinguish between effects of variables on site fidelity versus truesurvival. Our...
Using a bioclimatic envelope approach, University of Alberta investigators project how the distribution and abundance of boreal forest birds across North America will respond to different scenarios of future climate-change. Investigation emphasis is on mapping and quantifying potential range expansions of boreal bird species into Arctic and subarctic regions across Alaska and Canada. The final products demonstrate a broad continental-scale overview of potential shifts in avian distribution.
Arctic wetlands, where millions of local and migratory birds nest, are composed of a mosaic of ice wedge polygons, non-patterned tundra, and large vegetated drained thaw lake basins. Regional climate projections suggest that evapotranspiration, rainfall, and snowfall will increase, making it difficult to predict how surface water distribution might change and how habitats for the invertebrate resources used by waterbirds will be impacted. This study will focus on evaluating how climate change will affect the invertebrate community, and whether the change in climate (through changes in hydrology and surface energy balance) could induce a trophic mismatch that might alter the growth and survival of shorebird young....
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Climate models project the rapid warming of boreal and arctic regions of NorthAmerica. This has led to predictions that boreal forest vegetation and fauna will track these changes andshift northward into the arctic over the next century. We used a comprehensive dataset of avian pointcountsurveys from across boreal Canada and Alaska, combined with the best-available interpolatedclimate data, to develop bioclimatic niche models of current avian distribution and density for 102 nativespecies of forest songbirds. We then used a downscaling of projected climates in future periods (2011–2040, 2041–2070, 2071–2100) to assess the potential for these species to shift their ranges and increasetheir abundance across North...
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To better understand and predict effects of climate change on wetlands, invertebrates and shorebirds, the ‘CEWISH’ group,composed of Cryohydrology, Invertebrate, Shorebird Food Use, and Shorebird/Population Modeling teams, collected fielddata at Barrow, Alaska, between May and September 2014–2015. The Cryohydrology team measured end-of-wintersnow accumulation, snowmelt at the landscape scale, pond water levels, and pond water and sediment temperatures. TheInvertebrate team monitored emergence at historic ponds, and documented emergence rates of dominant chironomid taxaunder different experimentally controlled thermal regimes. The Shorebird Food Use team developed a DNA library ofpotential prey items using samples...
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