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M Lisa Floyd

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The fire history of Piñon–Juniper (Pinus edulis–Juniperus osteosperma) woodlands in much of the southwestern United States is poorly understood, and as a result, fire management decisions are being made without a rigorous ecological underpinning. We investigated the historic fire regimes in Piñon–Juniper woodlands on the Mesa Verde cuesta utilizing stand and age structures. All Piñon trees in eight stands were aged and stand age was extrapolated to the surrounding landscapes using digital imagery, creating a time-since-fire map of the 1995 landscape. Six sampled stands were over 400 years, while two were between 200 and 300 years. Stand-replacing fire with a rotation of 400 years or longer characterized this Piñon–Juniper...
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Livestock grazing is the most ubiquitous land use in western North America, yet it rarely has been studied in a controlled manner because of the lack of large areas free of grazing. We compared the ecological effects of three grazing treatments—long-term protection, short-term protection, and currently grazed—at Chaco Culture National Historic Park in northern New Mexico. Chaco has a long history of human habitation and is now one of the largest grazing exclosures in the American West. We studied the effects of livestock grazing on the cover of plants, soil crusts, and plant species richness at six sites with different potential natural vegetation. Species richness was higher under long-term protection than under...
This book gathers together noted scientists and historians to celebrate the varied and unique woodland region surrounding Mesa Verde National Park. One of the most widespread habitat types in the West, piñon-juniper woodlands have faced extensive eradication, grazing pressures, and the encroachment of human developments, and, consequently, only a few mature stands have reached their full growth potential. Mesa Verde Country, with its deep canyons and high ridgetops, is the magnificent home of many of these ancient stands. Impressively broad in scope, Floyd's volume thoroughly explores Mesa Verde Country's important and historic ecosystem. Covering such diverse topics as geologic evolution, natural history, human...
The fire history of Piñon–Juniper (Pinus edulis–Juniperus osteosperma) woodlands in much of the southwestern United States is poorly understood, and as a result, fire management decisions are being made without a rigorous ecological underpinning. We investigated the historic fire regimes in Piñon–Juniper woodlands on the Mesa Verde cuesta utilizing stand and age structures. All Piñon trees in eight stands were aged and stand age was extrapolated to the surrounding landscapes using digital imagery, creating a time-since-fire map of the 1995 landscape. Six sampled stands were over 400 years, while two were between 200 and 300 years. Stand-replacing fire with a rotation of 400 years or longer characterized...
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This book gathers together noted scientists and historians to celebrate the varied and unique woodland region surrounding Mesa Verde National Park. One of the most widespread habitat types in the West, piñon-juniper woodlands have faced extensive eradication, grazing pressures, and the encroachment of human developments, and, consequently, only a few mature stands have reached their full growth potential. Mesa Verde Country, with its deep canyons and high ridgetops, is the magnificent home of many of these ancient stands. Impressively broad in scope, Floyd's volume thoroughly explores Mesa Verde Country's important and historic ecosystem. Covering such diverse topics as geologic evolution, natural history, human...
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