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Kristine L. Metzger

Whooping cranes (Grus americana) of the Aransas-Wood Buffalo population migrate twice each year through the Great Plains in North America. Recovery activities for this endangered species include providing adequate places to stop and rest during migration, which are generally referred to as stopover sites. To assist in recovery efforts, initial estimates of stopover site use intensity are presented, which provide opportunity to identify areas across the migration range used more intensively by whooping cranes. We used location data acquired from 58 unique individuals fitted with platform transmitting terminals that collected global position system locations. Radio-tagged birds provided 2,158 stopover sites over 10...
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Endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana) of the Aransas-Wood Buffalo population migrate through the Great Plains twice each year. Although there is much interest in conservation and management for this species, information regarding characteristics of nocturnal roost sites used during migration has been limited and based largely on incidental observations. Using high-quality location data collected concurrently, we directed a companion field study designed to characterize sites used as roost or day-use sites to augment knowledge and assist the Platte River Recovery Implementation Program in identifying migration habitat for restoration, conservation, and management actions along the Platte River in central Nebraska....
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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Whooping cranes (Grus americana) of the Aransas-Wood Buffalo population migrate twice each year through the Great Plains in North America. Recovery activities for this endangered species include providing adequate places to stop and rest during migration, which are generally referred to as stopover sites. To assist in recovery efforts, initial estimates of stopover site use intensity are presented, which provide opportunity to identify areas across the migration range used more intensively by whooping cranes. We used location data acquired from 58 unique individuals fitted with platform transmitting terminals that collected global position system locations. Radio-tagged birds provided 2,158 stopover sites over 10...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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These data were developed to support an effort to characterize migration strategies in the U.S. Great Plains and Canadian Prairies and to explore sources of heterogeneity in their migration strategy, including space use, timing, and performance. Data come from locations and other information related to 58 marked Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) from 2010–2016. These data represent basic information about space use during migrations of marked whooping cranes, including intensity of use and fidelity.
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These data were developed to support an effort to characterize migration strategies in the U.S. Great Plains and Canadian Prairies and to explore sources of heterogeneity in their migration strategy, including space use, timing, and performance. Data come from locations and other information related to 58 marked Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) from 2010–2016. These data represent basic information about migrations of marked whooping cranes, including dates of initiation and termination of migration, time in migration, distance of migration, number of stopover sites used, and other metrics. Also included are data related to individual sites used by whooping cranes during migration.
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