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Kristin L Jaeger

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As part of a study to investigate the causes of channel narrowing and incision in Canyon de Chelly National Monument, the effects of Tamarisk and Russian-olive on streambank stability were investigated. In this study, root tensile strengths and distributions in streambanks were measured and used in combination with a root-reinforcement model, RipRoot, to estimate the additional cohesion provided to layers of each streambank. The additional cohesion provided by the roots in each 0.1-m layer ranged from 0 to 6.9 kPa for Tamarisk and from 0 to 14.2 kPa for Russian-olive. Average root-reinforcement values over the entire bank profile were 2.5 and 3.2 kPa for Tamarisk and Russian-olive, respectively. The implications...
Streams are classified as perennial (flowing uninterrupted, year-round) or intermittent (flowing part of the year) or ephemeral (flowing only during rainfall events). The classifications of “streamflow permanence” were primarily established in the middle 20th century and are often outdated and inaccurate today if they were not adjusted for changes in land use, wildfires, or climate. Understanding where streams are perennial is important for a variety of reasons. For example, perennial streams receive special regulatory protections under a variety of statutes, and provide important habitat for fish, wildlife, and other species. To predict the likelihood that streams are perennial, we compiled nearly 25,000 observations...
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IMPORTANT NOTE: More recent versions of these data release are available at this link. This dataset includes spatial locations where streamflow permanence observations (continuous flow, discontinuous flow, and dry) were recorded using the FLOwPER (FLOw PERmanence) field survey available in the Survey 123 and S1 mobile application. Additional information to describe the field conditions are included as part of the survey. Field observations in the FLOwPER Database have not been processed for quality control including spatial data accuracy or association with a stream network such as the National Hydrography Dataset. Streamflow permanence observations are collected from several governmental and non-governmental organizations...
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This dataset provides details from stream metabolism models for 20 stream sites in the United States that were sampled as part of the National Water Quality Program's Regional Stream Quality Assessments (RSQA). Metabolism was estimated at each site using the streamMetabolizer package in R. For each of the 20 sites, three files are provided; (1) the input data, which includes continuous dissolved oxygen, water temperature, light, and stream depth, (2) the output data containing the daily metabolism estimates, and (3) a site-specific html 'guide' for running the streamMetabolizer package in R. The site 'short_name' is included in each file name to distinguish the files associated with each field site. Final metabolism...
Wood load, channel parameters and valley parameters were surveyed in 50 contiguous stream segments each 25 m in length along 12 streams in the Colorado Front Range. Length and diameter of each piece of wood were measured, and the orientation of each piece was tallied as a ramp, buried, bridge or unattached. These data were then used to evaluate longitudinal patterns of wood distribution in forested headwater streams of the Colorado Front Range, and potential channel-, valley- and watershed-scale controls on these patterns. We hypothesized that (i) wood load decreases downstream, (ii) wood is non-randomly distributed at channel lengths of tens to hundreds of meters as a result of the presence of wood jams and (iii)...
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