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Kristin B Byrd

Kristin Byrd presented how this project aids conservation of California rangelands by identifying future integrated threats of climate change and land use change, and will quantify two main co-benefits of rangeland conservation – water supply and carbon sequestration. Through a multi-stakeholder partnership, the project proponents will develop integrated climate change/land use change scenarios for the Central Valley and Chaparral and Oak Woodland eco-regions, and disseminate information about future potential threats to high priority conservation areas within the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition (CRCC) study area, which includes the foothills around the Central Valley and most of the southern Inner Coast...
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Note: This dataset has been revised and superseded by version 2.0, available here: https://doi.org/10.5066/P90PG34S. Remote sensing based maps of tidal marshes, both of their extents and carbon stocks, have the potential to play a key role in conducting greenhouse gas inventories and implementing climate mitigation policies. Our objective was to generate a single remote sensing model of tidal marsh aboveground biomass and carbon that represents nationally diverse tidal marshes within the conterminous United States (CONUS). To meet this objective we developed the first national-scale dataset of aboveground tidal marsh biomass, species composition, and aboveground plant carbon content (%C) from six CONUS regions:...
Case Study: Integrated Scenarios and Outreach for Habitat Threat Assessments on California RangelandsWe developed six scenarios organized around our management question: How can we maintain viable ranchlands and their ecosystem services in light of future integrated threats? The scenarios represent alternative futures of climate/land use/hydrological change for the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition (Rangeland Coalition) focus area (the foothills around the Central Valley and most of the southern Inner Coast Range) based on (a) consistent storylines of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES)5 and (b) downscaled global climate models (GCMs) that represent...
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To support coordinated conservation, wetland restoration, and climate adaptation planning, we have developed five future scenarios of the Central Valley's seasonally flooded cropland and wetland waterbird habitat based on the State’s most recent climate and land use projections (Wilson et al. 2021).The USGS Western Geographic Science Center and Point Blue Conservation Science modeled a Business-as-Usual scenario plus the four scenarios developed for the Central Valley Landscape Conservation Project, which diverged along two key themes: water availability and management for conservation. Scenarios varied by climate projection (hot and wet vs. warm and dry) and management priorities (wetland restoration rate, crop...
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We produced a time series of maps of habitat structure within wetlands of the Central Valley of California. The structure of open water and tall emergent vegetation, such as Typha spp. and Schoenoplectus spp., is critical for migratory birds. Through field observation and digitization of high resolution imagery we identified the locations of tall emergent vegetation, water, and other land cover. Using a random forest classification, we classified multispectral Landsat 8 imagery 2013-2017. We used images from the fall when most wetlands are flooded and the summer to separate trees and tall emergent vegetation. The final maps show the distribution and extent of tall emergent vegetation within wetlands. Final time...
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