Skip to main content

Kevin Brinck

thumbnail
Hawaiʻi is considered a worldwide biodiversity hotspot, with nearly 90 percent of its native plants found nowhere else in the world. However, about half of these native plants are imperiled by threats including human development, non-native species, and climate change. Through this project, scientists modeled the relative vulnerability of over 1,000 native plant species to the effects of climate change. A panel of experts in Hawaiian plant species assisted with the development of the model and verified its results. From the model, researchers were able to develop a vulnerability score for each plant species and identify categories of species with high, medium, and low vulnerability to climate change. This information...
thumbnail
The Hawaii Forest Bird Survey (HFBS) systematically characterized plant and bird communities across transects spanning all major Hawaiian Islands except O‘ahu. This extensive dataset has now been organized into a database and associated geographic information system (GIS) layers. This baseline provides an opportunity to assess how forest ecosystems and their constituent bird and plant populations have changed over time. As part of the HaBiTATS (Hawaiian Biodiversity Trends Across Time and Space) project, a select area on Hawai‘i Island was surveyed in 2015 with the objective of demonstrating the potential of using the HFBS methodology to reassess the status of bird and plant communities across multiple geographic...
thumbnail
The Hawaii Forest Bird Survey (HFBS) systematically characterized plant and bird communities across transects spanning all major Hawaiian Islands except O‘ahu. This extensive dataset has now been organized into a database and associated geographic information system (GIS) layers. This baseline provides an opportunity to assess how forest ecosystems and their constituent bird and plant populations have changed over time. As part of the HaBiTATS (Hawaiian Biodiversity Trends Across Time and Space) project, a select area on Hawai‘i Island was surveyed in 2015 with the objective of demonstrating the potential of using the HFBS methodology to reassess the status of bird and plant communities across multiple geographic...
thumbnail
In Hawai‘i and other oceanic islands with few native land mammals, black rats (Rattus rattus) are among the most damaging invasive vertebrate species to native forest bird populations and habitats, due to their arboreal behavior and generalist foraging habitats and habitat use. This is a selected data set used to assess the impacts of rodenticide treatment on black rat (Rattus rattus) abundance within Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (HAVO). The key objective was to identify rat abundance before and after rodenticide treatment, using paired non-treatment and treatment plots at high elevation (1700-1830m) and low elevation (1220-1340 m). This dataset includes the results of a mark recapture study that took place within...
thumbnail
Several previously published reports and geographic information system (GIS) data layers were used to code information on site attributes for each assessment plot using the spatial join tool in ArcMap. This information was used for an analysis of dieback and non-dieback habitat characteristics. The results of this analysis are presented in this table which depicts the probability of heavy to severe canopy dieback occurring at some time at a particular 30 x 30 m pixel location within the study area.
View more...
ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.