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Justin Brandt

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As part of the USGS National Water Use Compilation, the California Water Science Center works in cooperation with local, State, and Federal agencies as well as academic and private organizations to collect and report total water withdrawals for California. The 2010 California water use data are aggregated here, in this website, for the first time. The California Water Science Center released these data ahead of the online USGS National Water Use Compilation circular report, in response to increased interest associated with current drought conditions. The national report is expected to be released late in 2014. The data on this website represents the most current California water use data available in the USGS National...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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Actual evapotranspiration (ETa) values estimated for specified areas including 1) total county areas; 2) potentially irrigated areas within each county; and 3) mapped extents of irrigated lands within each county provided by some states. These ETa estimates were provided to the USGS National Water Use Science Project by the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center (Gabriel Senay and MacKenzie Friedrichs, written communication, 2/20/2017) and are based on 1-square kilometer resolution 2015 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data analyzed through the operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model using methods of Senay and others (2013). Reference: Senay,...
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The Central Valley, and particularly the San Joaquin Valley, has a long history of land subsidence caused by groundwater development. The extensive withdrawal of groundwater from the unconsolidated deposits of the San Joaquin Valley lowered groundwater levels and caused widespread land subsidence—reaching 9 meters by 1981. More than half of the thickness of the aquifer system is composed of fine-grained sediments, including clays, silts, and sandy or silty clays that are susceptible to compaction. In an effort to aid water managers in understanding how water moves through the aquifer system, predicting water-supply scenarios, and addressing issues related to water competition, the United States Geological Survey...
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The Central Valley, and particularly the San Joaquin Valley, has a long history of land subsidence caused by groundwater development. The extensive withdrawal of groundwater from the unconsolidated deposits of the San Joaquin Valley lowered groundwater levels and caused widespread land subsidence—reaching 9 meters by 1981. More than half of the thickness of the aquifer system is composed of fine-grained sediments, including clays, silts, and sandy or silty clays that are susceptible to compaction. In an effort to aid water managers in understanding how water moves through the aquifer system, predicting water-supply scenarios, and addressing issues related to water competition, the United States Geological Survey...
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Agua Caliente Spring, in downtown Palm Springs, California, has been used for recreation and medicinal therapy for hundreds of years and currently (2008) is the source of hot water for the Spa Resort owned by the Agua Caliente Band of the Cahuilla Indians. The Agua Caliente Spring is located about 1,500 feet east of the eastern front of the San Jacinto Mountains on the southeast-sloping alluvial plain of the Coachella Valley. The objectives of this study were to (1) define the geologic structure associated with the Agua Caliente Spring; (2) define the source(s), and possibly the age(s), of water discharged by the spring; (3) ascertain the seasonal and longer-term variability of the natural discharge, water temperature,...
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