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Julian Wood

An online decision support tool for managers, planners, conservation practitioners and scientists.The models generating these maps are the first to take into account the ability of marshes to accrete, or keep up with, rising sea levels, in the San Francisco Bay Estuary.PRBO has generated a series of scenarios to provide a range of projections to address the uncertainty in future rates of sea-level rise and suspended sediment availability.Our maps cover the entire Estuary allowing for analyses at multiple spatial scales.This tool displays maps created at a high spatial resolution using the best available elevation data. The website will be continually updated as new data becomes availableThe tool is the first to...
Conservation priority maps based on combined bird species current and projected abundance and distribution, updated with new model with improved inputs.Point Blue Conservation Science is currently assessing the effects of sea-level rise (SLR) and salinity changes on San Francisco Bay tidal marsh ecosystems. Tidal marshes are naturally resilient to SLR, in that they can build up elevation through the capture of suspended sediment and deposition of organic material (vegetation). Thus, a “bathtub” model approach is not appropriate for assessing impacts to this dynamic habitat. Rather, dynamic accretion potential can be modeled annually based on tidal inundation, sediment availability, and the rate of organic accumulation...
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The clapper rail (Rallus longirostris) recently was split into two sister groups (Chesser et al. 2014) on the basis of phylogenetic analyses (Maley and Brumfield 2013). The original grouping is now represented on the East Coast of North America by the Clapper rail (Rallus crepitans) and on the West Coast by the Ridgway’s rail (Rallus obsoletus). The California Ridgeway’s rail (Rallus obsoletus obsoletus; hereafter California rail) is the largest of 3 Ridgway’s rail subspecies which also include R. o. levipes (light-footed rail) and R. o. yumanensis (Yuma rail) (Eddleman and Conway 1994). The California rail is also the largest resident terrestrial vertebrate that lives solely in San Francisco Bay salt marshes. Formerly...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
To be successful, natural resource managers need to synthesize diverse information on the effects of management actions, climate change and other stressors on wildlife populations at appropriate scales. The project team developed a Decision Support Tool (DST) that integrates the results of multi-disciplinary, multi-taxa modeling allowing users to project outcomes of conservation actions, accounting for effects of climate change and other stressors. This DST builds on work to improve a sea level rise tool for adaptive tidal wetland restoration and management. The DST provides information on how restoration can increase population resilience and long-term persistence at multiple scales for multiple species throughout...
Current and projected bird distribution and abundance layers, updated with new model that has better inputs. Point Blue Conservation Science assessed the effects of sea-level rise (SLR) and salinity changes on San Francisco Bay tidal marsh ecosystems. Tidal marshes are naturally resilient to SLR, in that they can build up elevation through the capture of suspended sediment and deposition of organic material (vegetation). Thus, a “bathtub” model approach is not appropriate for assessing impacts to this dynamic habitat. Rather, dynamic accretion potential can be modeled annually based on tidal inundation, sediment availability, and the rate of organic accumulation (related to salinity).Working with researchers at...
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