Skip to main content

John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

thumbnail
The scaling of physical, biological, ecological and social phenomena is a major focus of efforts to develop simple representations of complex systems. Much of the attention has been on discovering universal scaling laws that emerge from simple physical and geometric processes. However, there are regular patterns of departures both from those scaling laws and from continuous distributions of attributes of systems. Those departures often demonstrate the development of self-organized interactions between living systems and physical processes over narrower ranges of scale.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
Integrated basin management is concerned with the interactions of physical, ecological, economic, and social systems as they affect the operation, planning, and policy making processes inherent in the management of land and water resources. Systems of integrated hydrological, chemical, biological, ecological, and socioeconomic models are typically used to assess the effects of proposed management alternatives on basin resources, or to manage basin resources in real time. Water is a common thread linking many of the components among these models. The ability to adequately simulate rainfall-runoff processes and their interactions with processes related to other system components significantly affects the integrated...
Water having entered a stream channel from the surrounding catchment may continue to have connections with the catchment. In the stream's hyporheic zone, water “in the channel” exchanges with “groundwater” in the bed of the stream. Hyporheic exchange flows typically occur at scales small relative to the length and volumetric transport characteristics of the stream. Nevertheless, it is well documented that hyporheic exchange flows significantly influence nutrient dynamics. Additionally, there is evidence of hyporheic exchange flows similarly influencing the processes establishing the concentrations of major-ions and metals in stream-catchment systems. It is within the contexts of (i) solute transport and (ii) the...
thumbnail
Adaptive management emerged as an important resource management strategy for major river systems in the United States (US) in the early 1990s. The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (‘the Program’) was formally established in 1997 to fulfill a statutory requirement in the 1992 Grand Canyon Protection Act (GCPA). The GCPA aimed to improve natural resource conditions in the Colorado River corridor in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona that were affected by the Glen Canyon dam. The Program achieves this by using science and a variety of stakeholder perspectives to inform decisions about dam operations. Since the Program started the ecosystem is now much better...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
View more...
ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.