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Jennifer Cartwright

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Vernal pools are small, seasonal wetlands that provide critically important seasonal habitat for many amphibian species of conservation concern. Natural resource managers and scientists in the Northeast, as well as the Northeast Refugia Research Coalition, coordinated by the Northeast CSC, recently identified vernal pools as a priority ecosystem to study, and recent revisions to State Wildlife Action Plans highlighted climate change and disease as primary threats to key vernal pool ecosystems. Mapping out the hydrology of vernal pools across the Northeast is an important step in informing land management and conservation decision-making. Project researchers modeled the hydrology of roughly 450 vernal pools from...
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This dataset contains data collected within limestone cedar glades at Stones River National Battlefield (STRI) near Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This dataset contains information on soil microbial metabolic response for soil samples obtained from certain quadrat locations (points) within 12 selected cedar glades. This information derives from substrate utilization profiles based on Biolog EcoPlates (Biolog, Inc., Hayward, CA, USA) which were inoculated with soil slurries containing the entire microbial community present in each soil sample. EcoPlates contain 31 sole-carbon substrates (present in triplicate on each plate) and one blank (control) well. Once the microbial community from a soil sample is inoculated onto...
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Climate change threatens many wildlife species across the Pacific Northwest. As the climate continues to change, wildlife managers are faced with the ever-increasing challenge of allocating scarce resources to conserve at-risk species, and require more information to prioritize sites for conservation. However, climate change will affect species differently in different places. In fact, some places may serve as refuges for wildlife—places where animals can remain or to which they can easily move to escape the worst impacts of climate change. Currently, different datasets exist for identifying these resilient landscapes, known as climate refugia, but they are often not readily useable by wildlife managers. To address...
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This dataset contains data collected within limestone cedar glades at Stones River National Battlefield (STRI) near Murfreesboro, Tennessee. This dataset contains measurements of soil respiration at certain quadrat locations (points) within 12 selected cedar glades. Field measurements were made of soil respiration (carbon dioxide efflux) using a LICOR Infrared Gas Analyzer (IRGA), LI-6400 XT portable photosynthesis device (LICOR Inc., Lincoln, NE, USA), fitted with a soil-chamber attachment. At least 48 hours prior to soil respiration measurement, three soil collars (plastic rings of approximately 2 inches depth) were inserted into the soil surface at each point and the height of each soil collar above the soil...
Abstract from NE CASC: Vernal pools are small, seasonal wetlands that provide critically important seasonal habitat for many amphibian species of conservation concern. Natural resource managers and scientists in the Northeast, as well as the Northeast Refugia Research Coalition, coordinated by the Northeast CASC, recently identified vernal pools as a priority ecosystem to study, and recent revisions to State Wildlife Action Plans highlighted climate change and disease as primary threats to key vernal pool ecosystems. Mapping out the hydrology of vernal pools across the Northeast is an important step in informing land management and conservation decision-making. Project researchers will collect hydrology data over...
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