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Jason Dunham

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Isaak, D., S. Wenger, E. Peterson, J. Ver Hoef, C. Luce, S. Hostetler, J. Dunham, J. Kershner, B. Roper, D. Nagel, D. Horan, G. Chandler, S. Parkes, S. Wollrab. 2015. Development and application of NorWeST stream temperature climate scenarios for the Pacific Northwest. North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative webinar, January 27.
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IMPORTANT NOTE: More recent versions of these data release are available at this link. This dataset includes spatial locations where streamflow permanence observations (continuous flow, discontinuous flow, and dry) were recorded using the FLOwPER (FLOw PERmanence) field survey available in the Survey 123 and S1 mobile application. Additional information to describe the field conditions are included as part of the survey. Field observations in the FLOwPER Database have not been processed for quality control including spatial data accuracy or association with a stream network such as the National Hydrography Dataset. Streamflow permanence observations are collected from several governmental and non-governmental organizations...
Streams are classified as perennial (flowing uninterrupted, year-round) or intermittent (flowing part of the year) or ephemeral (flowing only during rainfall events). The classifications of “streamflow permanence” were primarily established in the middle 20th century and are often outdated and inaccurate today if they were not adjusted for changes in land use, wildfires, or climate. Understanding where streams are perennial is important for a variety of reasons. For example, perennial streams receive special regulatory protections under a variety of statutes, and provide important habitat for fish, wildlife, and other species. To predict the likelihood that streams are perennial, we compiled nearly 25,000 observations...
We will translate existing modeled hydroclimatic data into metrics used for water crossing design and replacement. WDFW permits (Hydraulic Code Rules, Chapter 220-110 WAC) and provides technical guidance for construction of hundreds of fish passable culverts, a number which is expected to rise dramatically in response to a 2013 federal court injunction directing the state to repair thousands of culverts that inhibit salmon migration. Current WDFW design guidance does not account for changes in hydrology resulting from climate change. This project will support the development of designs that maintain desired performance (e.g. connectivity benefits to aquatic organisms) throughout water crossings expected life.This...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2014, Academics & scientific researchers, Anadromous fish, Applications and Tools, Climate Change, All tags...
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This GIS dataset is the primary data product produced for the NW Climate Science Center-funded project, "Rangewide climate vulnerability assessment for threatened Bull Trout" (FRESC Study ID 851). We used predictions of temperatures in streams across approximately two-thirds of the species' range in the U.S. to map coldwater streams or “patches” suitable for spawning and early rearing of Bull Trout. Each patch consists of streams with contiguous reaches of cold water. Patches were delineated using medium resolution National Hydrography Dataset streams containing modeled temperatures available at 1 km intervals, as provided by the NorWeST project (http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/boise/AWAE/projects/NorWeST.html).Once the...
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