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J.B. Layzer

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Since 1979, abundances of sauger Stizostedion canadense have declined in the Tennessee River system. Reasons for this decline may include overharvest, loss of spawning habitat, and low recruitment due to extreme flows. The purpose of this study was to investigate the movements of saugers following winter concentration below Pickwick Dam, Tennessee. Thirty-seven saugers were implanted with radio transmitters directly below Pickwick Dam and were tracked between December 1992 and June 1993. Four saugers moved upstream through the locks at Pickwick Dam; the remaining fish stayed within the first 30 km of the tailwater throughout the spawning season. Three areas below Pickwick Dam were identified as possible March pre-spawn...
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We characterised microhabitat availability and use by adult and young-of-year (YOY) snail darters (Percina tanasiEtnier 1976) while snorkelling in the French Broad and Hiwassee rivers, TN, USA. Both age groups of snail darters disproportionately used most microhabitat variables compared to their availability. Snail darters primarily occupied moderately deep, swift water over gravel substrates with little macrophyte coverage and no silt. Univariate comparisons indicated that adult and YOY darters occupied different habitat, but there was no marked differences between principal components analysis plots of multivariate microhabitat use within a river. Although the availability of microhabitat variables differed between...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Ecology of Freshwater Fish
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The shells of most North American freshwater mussel species are not sexually dimorphic. During the brooding period, gravid females can be identified by inspection of marsupial gills; however, it is difficult to separate nongravid females from males in species lacking sexual dimorphism. The ability to differentiate males from females throughout the year would assist mussel conservation and research. Our objective was to test the accuracy and safety of a method to determine the sex of live mussels. We used a syringe to extract ???0.2 mL of gonadal fluid from 67 Elliptio dilatata and 65 Actinonaias ligamentina. The fluid was stained and examined microscopically for developing gametes. This method was safe and effective...
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The French Broad River originates in North Carolina, flows west into Tennessee and at its confluence with the Holston River forms the Tennessee River. Douglas Dam, located on the French Broad River 52 km above its mouth, is operated primarily for peaking hydroelectric power and flood control. Prior to completion of the dam in 1943, the lower French Broad River contained about 53 species of freshwater mussels and 100 species of fish. By 1977, the fauna in the 52-km-long tailwater was reduced to 12 species of mussels and 42 native species of fish. Improvements in tailwater conditions occurred following initiation of minimum flows in 1987, and consistent reaeration of discharge in 1993. From 1988 to 2002, we sampled...
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The bluemask darter Etheostoma (Doration) sp. is an endangered fish endemic to the upper Caney Fork system in the Cumberland River drainage in central Tennessee. Darters (Etheostoma spp.) are typically short-lived and exhibit rapid growth that quickly decreases with age. Consequently, estimating age of darters from length-frequency distributions can be difficult and subjective. We used a nonparametric kernel density estimator to reduce subjectivity in estimating ages of bluemask darters. Data were collected from a total of 2926 bluemask darters from the Collins River throughout three growing seasons. Additionally, data were collected from 842 bluemask darters from the Rocky River during one growing season. Analysis...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: American Midland Naturalist
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