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Hoblitt, Richard P.

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Typed caption accompanying slides: 19:18:25 new pyroclastic flow deposits from third eruptive pulse cover crater floor. Skamania County, Washington. (Photo by R. Hoblitt). Index card (nos. 1ct-98ct): Series of essentially time lapse photographs recording the three major eruptive pulses that began at 17:14 hours, 18:30 hours, and 19:02 hours Pacific Daylight Savings Time, July 22, 1980. Photographs were taken by Jim Vallance in a fixed wing aircraft, Michael P. "Mike" Doukas, Harry Glicken, and Richard P. "Rick" Hoblitt in a helicopter. Skamania County, Washington. (Complete captions on file). Note: Mount St. Helens - List of color transparencies (slides) of the July 22, 1980 eruption. The following slides (1-114)...
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Typed caption accompanying slides and index card: Scenic view, at 20:54 hours (PDT), looking northeast at ash plume at dusk. Skamania County, Washington. (Photo by Richard P. Hoblitt). Note: Mount St. Helens - List of color transparencies (slides) of the July 22, 1980 eruption. The following slides (1-114) of the July 22, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens were taken by Jim Vallance, who was in a U.S. Forest Service fixed wing aircraft and by Mike Doukas, Harry Glicken and Rick Hoblitt, who were in a U.S. Geological Survey helicopter. There were three major eruptive pulses on July 22, 1980. They began at 17:14, 18:30 and 19:02 PDT.
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Slide description and index card (69ct, 79ct): Mount St Helens in eruption. Oblique aerial view of Mount St. Helens from the northwest: first view of new crater/north side. Photos are within seconds of each other. 20:09 hrs. Skamania County, Washington. May 18, 1980. (Portion of plane wing visible at left).
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