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H.J. Knebel

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Recent seismic-reflection data show that the topography on the Continental Shelf around Hudson Canyon is composed of a series of depressions having variable spacings (< 100 m to 2 km), depths (1-10 m), outlines, and bottom configurations that give the sea floor an anomalous "jagged" appearance in profile. The acoustic and sedimentary characteristics, the proximity to relict shores, and the areal distribution indicate that this rough topography is an erosional surface formed on Upper Pleistocene silty sands about 13,000 to 15,000 years ago by processes related to Hudson Canyon. The pronounced southward extension of the surface, in particular, may reflect a former increase in the longshore-current erosion capacity...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Marine Geology
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A review of recent data on the velocity of bottom currents, the frequency of bottom-sediment movement, the kinds and amounts of suspended sediments in near-bottom waters, and the acoustic and sedimentary features of subbottom strata indicates that the characteristics of the ubiquitous sand sheet on the Atlantic outer continental shelf of the United States have been controlled by a variety of past and present processes. Although these processes collectively have had a widespread effect on the characteristics of the sand sheet, the relative importance of each process changes geographically. On Georges Bank, late Pleistocene glaciations along with modern tidal currents and the regional circulation pattern have played...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Marine Geology
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This report illustrates, describes, and briefly discusses the discusses the distribution and characteristics of Holocene sediments in Penobscot Bay, Maine. Penobscot Bay is one of the major estuaries along the U.S. Atlantic coast. It constitutes as area of about 1,100 km2 and extends more than 50 km inland from the Gulf of Maine. The bay is divided into three main passages by numerous islands (Index map and fig. 1).
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