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Gloss, Steven P

Silica, nitrate, total and dissolved phosphorus, and conductivity were measured during spring and summer in Lake Powell, Utah-Arizona. Phytoplankton productivity was also de- termined. Conductivity is used as a tracer for delineating the advective influence of inflows from the Colorado and San Juan Rivers on nutrient delivery and distribution in the reservoir. High spring runoff (1,000-2,000 m3 s-') enters the lake essentially as an overflow and dom- inates the nutrient cycle in the epilimnion. The interaction of advective nutrient delivery and high turbidity controls the distribution of phytoplankton productivity and nutrient depletion. Published in Limnology and Oceanography, volume 25, issue 2, on pages 219 -...
Restoration activity has exponentially increased across the Southwest since 1990. Over 37,000 records were compiled into the National River Restoration Science Synthesis (NRRSS) database to summarize restoration trends and assess project effectiveness. We analyzed data from 576 restoration projects in the Southwest (NRRSS-SW). More than 50% of projects were less than or equal to 3 km in length. The most common restoration project intent categories were riparian management, water quality management, in-stream habitat improvement, and flow modification. Common project activities were well matched to goals. Conservative estimates of total restoration costs exceeded $500 million. Most restoration dollars have been allocated...
The buffering of riverine dissolved silica and phosphate by sorption reactions between the aqueous phase and suspended sediment is examined with the turbid Colorado River system as a model. Concentrations are found to lie in a range predicted from laboratory sorption experiments with natural sediments and waters. Phosphate is probably highly buffered by suspended sediment during river flow while silica is not. Silica appreciably affects phosphate sorption reactions but not vice versa. Increased temperature results in higher silica but lower phosphate concentrations as a result of sorption. The buffering action of suspended sediments is largely complete within a few hours and is approximately proportional to the...
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