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Getches, David H

The Colorado River traverses and collectes the water of a vast, arid region. It drains snowmelt from the western slope of the Rockies in Colorado and Wyoming, from the Uintas of Utah, from the San Juans in Colorado and New Mexico, as well as runoff from the flashfloods across the Arizona deserts. The River and its major tributaries- the Green, the Yampa, the White, the Gunnison, the San Juan, the Little Colorado, and the Gila- thread country of breathtaking beauty, from glaciers to sand dunes, city streets to wilderness, timber to sagebrush, and the highest mountain range to the deepest canyon. In its 1,400-mile journey from the Continental Divide to the Gulf of California the Colorado drops almost 14,000 vertical...
This paper presents a summary of the findings and recommendations of the studies of severe, sustained drought reported in this special issue. The management facilities and institutions were found to be effective in protecting consumptive water users against drought, but much less effective in protecting nonconsumptive uses. Changes in intrastate water management were found to be effective in reducing the monetary value of damages, through reallocating shortages to low-valued uses, while only water banking and water marketing, among the possible interstate rule changes, were similarly effective. Players representing the basin states and the federal government in three gaming experiments were unable to agree upon...
The waters of the Colorado River are divided among seven states according to a complex ?Law of the River? drawn from interstate compacts, international treaties, statutes, and regulations. The Law of the River creates certain priorities among the states and the Republic of Mexico, and in the event of a severe sustained drought, the Law of the River dictates the distribution of water and operation of the elaborate reservoir system. Earlier work indicated that there is remarkable resilience in the system for established uses of water in the Lower Basin of the Colorado River. This work shows, based on an application of the Law of the River using computer modeling of operations of facilities on the Colorado River, that...
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