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Frank Krist

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This dataset is a compilation of forest insect, disease and abiotic damage mapped by aerial detection surveys on forested areas in the United States. At this time, the National Aerial Survey Data Standards require only mortality and defoliation data be collected and reported. However, many cooperators collect data on other types of damage and therefore, the national database has been designed to accommodate these data. Low-level flights, typically 1,000 to 2,000 feet above ground level, are used to map forest damage. Observers use paper maps, typically 1:100,000 scale USGS maps, upon which they record the damage. There is also a digital sketchmap system that may be used. The digital system uses GPS to display the...
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This dataset is a compilation of forest insect, disease and abiotic damage mapped by aerial detection surveys on forested areas in the United States. At this time, the National Aerial Survey Data Standards require only mortality and defoliation data be collected and reported. However, many cooperators collect data on other types of damage and therefore, the national database has been designed to accommodate these data. Low-level flights, typically 1,000 to 2,000 feet above ground level, are used to map forest damage. Observers use paper maps, typically 1:100,000 scale USGS maps, upon which they record the damage. There is also a digital sketchmap system that may be used. The digital system uses GPS to display the...
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This dataset is a compilation of forest insect, disease and abiotic damage mapped by aerial detection surveys on forested areas in the United States. At this time, the National Aerial Survey Data Standards require only mortality and defoliation data be collected and reported. However, many cooperators collect data on other types of damage and therefore, the national database has been designed to accommodate these data. Low-level flights, typically 1,000 to 2,000 feet above ground level, are used to map forest damage. Observers use paper maps, typically 1:100,000 scale USGS maps, upon which they record the damage. There is also a digital sketchmap system that may be used. The digital system uses GPS to display the...
thumbnail
This dataset is a compilation of forest insect, disease and abiotic damage mapped by aerial detection surveys on forested areas in the United States. At this time, the National Aerial Survey Data Standards require only mortality and defoliation data be collected and reported. However, many cooperators collect data on other types of damage and therefore, the national database has been designed to accommodate these data. Low-level flights, typically 1,000 to 2,000 feet above ground level, are used to map forest damage. Observers use paper maps, typically 1:100,000 scale USGS maps, upon which they record the damage. There is also a digital sketchmap system that may be used. The digital system uses GPS to display the...
thumbnail
This dataset is a compilation of forest insect, disease and abiotic damage mapped by aerial detection surveys on forested areas in the United States. At this time, the National Aerial Survey Data Standards require only mortality and defoliation data be collected and reported. However, many cooperators collect data on other types of damage and therefore, the national database has been designed to accommodate these data. Low-level flights, typically 1,000 to 2,000 feet above ground level, are used to map forest damage. Observers use paper maps, typically 1:100,000 scale USGS maps, upon which they record the damage. There is also a digital sketchmap system that may be used. The digital system uses GPS to display the...
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