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Fisher, Frederick S

Ore deposits in the western San Juan Mountains formed intermittently in middle to late Tertiary time, from about 30 to 10 m.y. ago, during essentially the same span as that of associated igneous activity, as indicated by 31 new K-Ar and fission-track ages. Mineralization occurred recurrently during the waning stages of evolution of several precaldera central volcanoes and also after formation of the Uncompahgre, San Juan, Silverton, and Lake City calderas. The richest ore deposits are associated with structures of the Silverton caldera, but they were emplaced 5 to 15 m.y. after the caldera formed. This mineralization appears genetically unrelated to evolution of the caldera and its associated magmatic system but...
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In 2001, an outbreak of acute respiratory disease occurred among persons working at a Native American archeological site at Dinosaur National Monument in northeastern Utah. Epidemiologic and environmental investigations were undertaken to determine the cause of the outbreak. A clinical case was defined by the presence of at least two of the following symptoms: self-reported fever, shortness of breath, or cough. Ten workers met the clinical case definition; 9 had serologic confirmation of coccidioidomycosis, and 8 were hospitalized. All 10 were present during sifting of dirt through screens on June 19; symptoms began 9?12 days later (median 10). Coccidioidomycosis also developed in a worker at the site in September...
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