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F.F. Fish

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A largemouth black bass fingerling preserved in formalin was sent to the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries Pathology Laboratory at Seattle, Washington, during the autumn of 1937, by a hatchery employee at Miles City, Montana. The fish exhibited several wart-like protuberances on the caudal peduncle, which aroused the curiosity of Mr. H. C. Topel, in charge of fish distribution at Miles City. He had observed the gradually increasing numbers of these lesions on the fish at this station for several years previous to 1937. Mr. Topel estimated that in 1937, 20 per cent of the adult bass were infected at the time of distribution, and lesions were noted on the fingerling and yearling stock as well.
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Of all the diseases responsible for the losses in the hatchery, those caused by the microscopic one-celled organisms, the bacteria, are the most common and present the most serious problem to the hatcheryman. They are found at practically every trout and salmon hatchery during some period of the year. The symptoms of the diseases they cause are difficult to recognize. This in itself is a hazard because treatment, to be successful, must be applied during the early stages or, in cases where no method of treatment is effective, the infected fish must be destroyed before the disease spreads to other parts of the hatchery. Here we have a group of diseases practically universal in distribution, difficult to recognize,...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Progressive Fish-Culturist
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The prevention or control of epidemics of fish diseases by applying a disinfecting solution in a uniform concentration directly to the water supply of a fish pond or trough for a definite period of time has been exceedingly slow in development. In so far as can be determined, the original idea should be credited to. Marsh and Robinson (1910). In their work on the control of algae in fish ponds by the continuous application of dilute copper sulphate solution, administered to the inflowing water supply by means of a floating syphon, they suggested this method as a possibility in the treatment of fish diseases. Following their work, this commendable idea seems to have remained quite dormant and apparently forgotten...
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No parasite common to hatchery salmon and trout possesses quite so varied a reputation as does Octomitus salmonis. Discovered, studied, and described independently, but essentially simultaneously, by Dr. Emmeline Moore and Dr. H. S. Davis, Octomitus salmonis was introduced to fish culture during the early twenties. This easily found and widely distributed parasite, once recognized, was soon held responsible for practically every ailment noted in trout hatcheries at that time. Such a reputation was doubtless deserved in some instances, but unquestionably many losses ascribed to Octomitus salmonis actually resulted from such troubles as bacterial gill disease, which was then unknown, or from less easily found parasites...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Progressive Fish-Culturist
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Just where true fish culture appeared in history depends entirely upon what one considers fish culture to be. If the transportation of fishes from regions of plenty to those of few is to be regarded as fish culture - as it is by some even today - then this story should start in remotest antiquity and deal with an amazing series of failures. However, fish culture to be classed as a science must include far more than mere transportation, it must include a deliberate effort on the part of man to master a technique of fish raising which will yield results far superior to Nature's. Accordingly, the wheel of history must be spun forward to the fifteenth century, A. D., when man first conceived the idea that with care...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Progressive Fish-Culturist
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