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Douglas K. Maurer

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Operating Criteria and Procedures established in 1988 for delivery of water for irrigation in the Newlands Project area include regulations and methods to increase Project efficiency. Public Law 101-618 of 1990 includes a target of 75-percent Project efficiency and a program of water-rights acquisition for wetlands maintenance. The directives could result in large reductions in water used for irrigation in the Carson Desert, potentially affecting ground-water supplies. Previous studies of the area have been evaluated to determine the current understanding of how aquifers are recharged, what controls the flow and quality of ground water, potential effects of changes in water use, and what additional information would...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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Ground-water flow and recharge from infiltration near Pine Nut Creek, east of Gardnerville, Nevada, were simulated using a single-layer numerical finite-difference model as part of a study made by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Carson Water Subconservancy District. The model was calibrated to 190 water-level measurements made in 27 wells in December 2000, and in 9 wells from August 1999 through April 2001. The purpose of this study was to estimate reasonable limits for the approximate volume of water that may be stored by recharge through infiltration basins, and the rate at which recharged water would dissipate or move towards the valley floor. Measured water levels in the study area show that...
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Drilling of two test holes into the Fallon basalt aquifer commenced August 14, 2001. The basalt aquifer is located beneath the Carson Desert, near Fallon, Nevada, and is the sole source of drinking water for the City of Fallon, the Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, and the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe. Basalt comprising the aquifer is exposed at Rattlesnake Hill, an eroded volcanic cone, about 1 mile northeast of Fallon, and the remainder is buried beneath sediments deposited by the Carson River and ancient Lake Lahontan to depths of 600 feet near its edges (fig. 1). The basalt-aquifer system is a mushroom-shaped body of highly permeable volcanic rock. Viewed from above, the lateral extent of the basalt body is oval-shaped,...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Fact Sheet
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