Skip to main content

Douglas G. Smith

thumbnail
Hydrologic and water-quality data were collected during October 2009–January 2011 to characterize nutrient and bacteria concentrations in stormwater runoff from agricultural fields that receive wastewater originating at a swine facility at North Carolina State University's Lake Wheeler Road Field Laboratory (LWRFL) in Wake County, North Carolina. The swine facility consists of six swine houses, two wastewater storage lagoons, and wastewater spray fields. The data-collection network consisted of 11 sampling sites, including 4 wastewater sites, 3 in-field runoff sites, and 4 stream sites. Continuous precipitation data were recorded with a raingage to document rainfall conditions during the study. Study sites were...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
thumbnail
The Cape Fear and Pee Dee River Basins in North Carolina and South Carolina were chosen as a focus area study (FAS) for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Census (NWC) in 2016. The objective of the NWC is to place technical information and tools in the hands of stake holders so that they can make decisions on water availability. The USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, comprised of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia, conducted a 3-year study of water use and availability to provide information related to the competing societal and ecological water needs in the Southeastern Atlantic Coastal Basins of the Carolinas. One task to meet this objective was compiling water withdrawal and return...
thumbnail
During 2002, a baseline study of hydrologic conditions was conducted, and selected features were mapped within the Mt. Pisgah campground on the Blue Ridge Parkway in Haywood County, North Carolina. Field surveys were performed by using global positioning system equipment one time (January 2002) during the study to locate hydrologic and other types of features in the study area. Water-level and streamflow data and seasonal water-quality samples were collected from a stream that receives all surface-water drainage from the campground area. During 2002, water levels (stage) in the stream ranged from 1.09 to 1.89 feet above gage datum (4,838.06 to 4,838.86 feet above mean sea level). Flow in the stream ranged from 0.05...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
thumbnail
SPAtially Referenced Regression on Watershed models developed for the Upper Midwest were used to help evaluate the nitrogen-load reductions likely to be achieved by a variety of agricultural conservation practices in the Upper Mississippi-Ohio River Basin (UMORB) and to compare these reductions to the 45% nitrogen-load reduction proposed to remediate hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). Our results indicate that nitrogen-management practices (improved fertilizer management and cover crops) fall short of achieving this goal, even if adopted on all cropland in the region. The goal of a 45% decrease in loads to the GoM can only be achieved through the coupling of nitrogen-management practices with innovative nitrogen-removal...
thumbnail
The coastal region which includes areas within South Carolina and North Carolina was chosen as a focus area study (FAS) for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Census (NWC) in 2016. The objective of the NWC is to place technical information and tools in the hands of stake holders so that they can make informed decisions on water availability. The USGS South Atlantic Water Science Center, comprised of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia, conducted a 3-year study of water use and availability, climate change, and population growth to provide information related to the competing societal and ecological water needs in the Southeastern Atlantic Coastal Basins of the Carolinas. The Coastal Carolinas...
View more...
ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.