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David McGuire, PhD

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These raster datasets represent historical stand age. The last four digits of the file name specifies the year represented by the raster. For example a file named Age_years_historical_1990.tif represents the year 1990. Cell values represent the age of vegetation in years since last fire, with zero (0) indicating burned area in that year. Files from years 1860-2006 use a variety of historical datasets for Boreal ALFRESCO model spin up and calibration to most closely match historical wildfire dynamics.
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These raster datasets represent historical stand age. The last four digits of the file name specifies the year represented by the raster. For example a file named Age_years_historical_1990.tif represents the year 1990. Cell values represent the age of vegetation in years since last fire, with zero (0) indicating burned area in that year. Files from years 1860-2006 use a variety of historical datasets for Boreal ALFRESCO model spin up and calibration to most closely match historical wildfire dynamics.
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The Integrated Ecosystem Model is designed to help resource managers understand the nature and expected rate of landscape change. Maps and other products generated by the IEM will illustrate how arctic and boreal landscapes are expected to alter due to climate-driven changes to vegetation, disturbance, hydrology, and permafrost. The products will also provide resource managers with an understanding of the uncertainty in the expected outcomes.
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These raster datasets represent historical stand age. The last four digits of the file name specifies the year represented by the raster. For example a file named Age_years_historical_1990.tif represents the year 1990. Cell values represent the age of vegetation in years since last fire, with zero (0) indicating burned area in that year. Files from years 1860-2006 use a variety of historical datasets for Boreal ALFRESCO model spin up and calibration to most closely match historical wildfire dynamics.
The Integrated Ecosystem Model (IEM) for Alaska and Northwest Canada Project integrated existing models of vegetation, disturbance, and permafrost into one complete ecosystem model for the state of Alaska and Northwest Canada.The final synchronized model will integrate existing climate, vegetation, disturbance, hydrology, and permafrost models to improve understanding of potential landscape, habitat and ecosystem change. The project’s (September 1, 2011 through August 31, 2016) primary goal was to develop the IEM modeling framework to integrate the driving components for and the interactions among disturbance regimes, permafrost dynamics, hydrology, and vegetation succession/migration for Alaska and Northwest Canada....
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