Skip to main content

David Diamond

thumbnail
Natural and semi-natural vegetation covers 4,209.6 acres (1,703.6 ha), or >98% of the park. Of that area, 76% is in woodland or forest and 23% is herbaceous vegetation. Two-thirds of the grasslands are mowed more than once annually and are dominated primarily by the non-native tall fescue (Schedonorusphoenix). Dry and typic upland oak-hickory woodland and forest together comprise 2,481 acres (1,004 ha), or 59% of the natural and semi-natural vegetation of the park.
thumbnail
We created an enduring features (EF, ecological site type, geophysical setting) dataset for Oklahoma that is similar to the EF dataset we created for Texas (see Diamond et al. 2016, Diamond and Elliott 2015, Elliott et al. 2014), . Digital soil map unit polygons (MUs), variables derived from digital elevation models (e.g. percent slope), and landform models (e.g. low, gentle slopes and flats in the Ozark and Ouachita Mountains) were combined to form this dataset. Among these, the low flats of the Ozark and Ouachita Mountains were most complicated to model because the sites had a low slope but were occupied by dry-mesic forest (in contrast to the low slope of uplands, which tended to be drier). A combination of slope...
thumbnail
A bare earth Digital Elevation Model (DEM) created from 2011 LiDAR LAS files for Austin and Colorado counties in Texas. LiDAR data collection was funded by the Texas Water Development Board. LiDAR LAS files were acquired from Texas Natural Resources Information System (TNRIS). The DEM is a dataset that depicts the topography of the bare earth surface (i.e. surface minus vegetation, buildings, powerlines, etc). This dataset was developled to be used in conjunction with the DSM to create a vegetation height surface (nDSM). The LAS point cloud was filtered to ground points only and the mean z value was calculated. A Digital Surface Model (DSM) created from 2011 LiDAR LAS files for Austin and Colorado counties in Texas....
thumbnail
Most of WICR, including 1,836 acres (743 hectares), or 93%, is semi-natural, whereas 7% is developed or in croplands designed to enhance interpretation of the battlefield during the engagement. Grasslands, including periodically mowed or burned open areas, cover roughly half of WICR. Successional woodlands and forests cover the other half. Small glades, though they cover Lesquerellafiliformis; Annis et al. 2011). Open areas at WICR are variable across years due to periodic mowing or burning. After mowing or prescribed fire, areas show a grassland aspect for one season, and thereafter appear increasingly shrub-dominated as perennial shrubs overtop grasses. Open areas also vary across short spatial scales, which reflects...
thumbnail
Previous vegetation mapping project has areas along the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma along the Red River where data was missing (gaps) or where overlaps contained contradictory mapped types (overlaps). These areas were corrected with this product. Gaps were corrected using new image objects attributed with landcover from the previous products and new soils data available from NRCS (gSSURGO). Overlaps were corrected by selecting one of the mapped types identified by previous products based on the state boundary provided by the U. S. Census Bureau (500k).
View more...
ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.