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David A. Clague

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This database release, USGS Data Series 171, contains data collected during four Japan-USA collaborative cruises that characterize the seafloor around the Hawaiian Islands. The Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) sponsored cruises in 1998, 1999, 2001, and 2002, to build a greater understanding of the deep marine geology around the Hawaiian Islands. During these cruises, scientists surveyed over 600,000 square kilometers of the seafloor with a hull-mounted multibeam seafloor-mapping sonar system (SEA BEAM® 2112), observed the seafloor and collected samples using robotic and manned submersible dives, collected dredge and piston-core samples, and performed single-channel seismic surveys.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Data Series
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We present detailed bathymetry, remotely operated vehicle (ROV) and submersible observations, and sedimentary and radiocarbon age data from carbonate deposits recovered from two submerged terraces at − 150 m (T1) and − 230 m (T2) off Lanai, Hawaii. The tops of the terraces are veneered by relatively thin (<5 m) in situ accumulations of coralline algal nodule, coralgal nodule, Halimeda and a derived oolitic facies deposited in intermediate (30–60 m) to deep fore-reef slope settings (60–120 m). The data are used to develop a sedimentary facies model that is consistent with eustatic sea-level variations over the last 30 ka. Both nodule facies on T1 and T2 initiated growth 30–29 ka following a fall in sea level of ∼50...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Marine Geology
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High-resolution bathymetric surveys from autonomous underwater vehicles ABE and D. Allan B. were merged to create a coregistered map of 71.7 km2 of the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Radiocarbon dating of foraminifera in cores from three dives of remotely operated vehicle Doc Ricketts provide minimum eruption ages for 40 lava flows that are combined with the bathymetric data to outline the eruptive and tectonic history. The ages range from Modern to 10,700 marine-calibrated years before present (yr BP). During a robust magmatic phase from >10,700 yr BP to ~4300 yr BP, flows erupted from an axial high and many flowed >5 km down the flanks; some partly buried adjacent valleys. Axial magma chambers (AMCs)...
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GLORIA side-scan imagery of the region north of Oahu was collected during two cruises in the spring of 1988. These cruises, F4-88-HW and F6-88-HW, discovered an extensive lava flow field on the Hawaiian Arch and extensive landslide deposits that moved down through the Hawaiian Moat and up onto the Hawaiian Arch. These landslide deposits were apparently derived from two separate submarine failures on the north side of Molokai and the northeast side of Oahu. The cruise reports for these cruises will be released as USGS Open-File Reports in 1989.This report summarizes the results of a subsequent cruise, F11-88-HW on the R/V Farnella, to sample some of the features discovered during the prior GLORIA surveys. Cruise...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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This report presents approximately 2,100 glass analyses from three tephra units of Kīlauea Volcano: the Keanakākoʻi Tephra, the Kulanaokuaiki Tephra, and the Pāhala Ash. It also includes some new analyses obtained as part of a re-evaluation of the MgO contents of glasses in two of the three original datasets; this re-evaluation was conducted to improve the consistency of glass MgO contents among the three datasets. The glass data are a principal focus of Helz and others (in press), which will appear in the AGU Monograph Hawaiian Volcanoes—From Source to Surface. The report is intended to support this publication, in addition to making the data available to the scientific community.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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