Skip to main content

Data Basin

thumbnail
This dataset represents the soil texture from SSURGO and STATSGO soil descriptions for soil map units in the state of western Oregon that lie within the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative. Soil texture is the mineral particle size distribution of soil particles within a soil horizon. This dataset also documents rock fragments and organic matter that may contribute to water infiltration, storage and relocation within the surface horizons of the soil profile. For reference, see NRCS soil texture triangle: http://soils.usda.gov/technical/aids/investigations/texture/
thumbnail
The LANDFIRE existing vegetation layers describe the following elements of existing vegetation for each LANDFIRE mapping zone: existing vegetation type, existing vegetation canopy cover, and existing vegetation height. Vegetation is mapped using predictive landscape models based on extensive field reference data, satellite imagery, biophysical gradient layers, and classification and regression trees.DATA SUMMARY: The existing vegetation type (EVT) data layer represents the current distribution of the terrestrial ecological systems classification developed by NatureServe for the western Hemisphere (http://www.natureserve.org/publications/usEcologicalsystems.jsp). A terrestrial ecological system is defined as a group...
thumbnail
This package contains 13 polygon layers representing baseline and predicted future climate niches (2050s & 2080s) of Pacific silver fir (Abies amabilis). The modeling algorithm Maxent and the Worldclim predictor set have been used to compute niche projections under two emission scenarios (A1B & A2A) based on three general circulation models (CSIRO, CCCMA & HADCM3). The shapefiles are derived from gridded model outputs with a grid cell resolution of 30 arc-seconds.
thumbnail
For his MS thesis, Brendan Rogers used the vegetation model MC1 to simulate vegetation dynamics, associated carbon and nitrogen cycle, water budget and wild fire impacts across the western 2/3 of the states of Oregon and Washington using climate input data from the PRISM group (Chris Daly, OSU) at a 30arc second (800m) spatial grain. The model was run from 1895 to 2100 assuming that nitrogen demand from the plants was always met so that the nitrogen concentrations in various plant parts never dropped below their minimum reported values. A CO2 enhancement effect increased productivity and water use efficiency as the atmospheric CO2 concentration increased. Future climate change scenarios were generated through statistical...
thumbnail
This dataset is a compilation of forest insect, disease and abiotic damage mapped by aerial detection surveys on forested areas in the United States. At this time, the National Aerial Survey Data Standards require only mortality and defoliation data be collected and reported. However, many cooperators collect data on other types of damage and therefore, the national database has been designed to accommodate these data. Low-level flights, typically 1,000 to 2,000 feet above ground level, are used to map forest damage. Observers use paper maps, typically 1:100,000 scale USGS maps, upon which they record the damage. There is also a digital sketchmap system that may be used. The digital system uses GPS to display the...
View more...
ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.