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Cook, Joseph A.

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This report summarizes the inventory of mammals of the five park units comprising the Arctic Network (ARCN) of the National Park Service, Alaska Region, between 2000 and 2003. This study was part of a cooperative effort of the Beringian Coevolution Project at the Museum of Southwestern Biology, University of New Mexico, and the ARCN Inventory and Monitoring Program of the National Park Service, Alaska division. We begin documenting the approximately 39 species of mammals that live in ARCN, with a primary focus on small mammals (i.e., shrews, voles, lemmings, weasels, porcupine, squirrels, and hares). This survey resulted in more than 3,000 primary specimens comprising 23 species. Small mammal abundance varied considerably...
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This report summarizes the inventory of mammals of three park units in the Southwest Alaska Network (SWAN) of the National Park Service, Alaska Region, in 2003 and 2004. This study was part of a cooperative effort of the Beringian Coevolution Project at the Museum of Southwestern Biology, University of New Mexico and the SWAN Inventory and Monitoring Program of the National Park Service of Alaska. We begin the process of documenting the approximately 38 species of mammals that occur in SWAN, with a primary focus on small mammals (i.e., shrews, voles, lemmings, weasels, porcupine, squirrels, and hares). This survey resulted in over 2000 primary specimens comprising 18 small mammal species. Small mammal captures varied...
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This report details the inventory of mammals in Lake Clark National Park and Preserve (LACL) between 7 and 31 July 2003 as part of a cooperative effort of the Beringian Coevolution Project at the Museum of Southwestern Biology, University of New Mexico and the Inventory and Monitoring Program of the National Park Service of Alaska. We begin the process of documenting the approximately 36 species of mammals that occur in the Park, with a primary focus on small mammals (i.e., shrews, voles, lemmings, weasels, porcupine, squirrels, and hares). This survey resulted in 856 primary specimens comprising 17 species. Across all localities sampled, two shrews (Sorex cinereus, S. monticolus) and a murid rodent (Clethrionomys...
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Effective conservation of insular populations requires careful consideration of biogeography, including colonization histories and patterns of endemism. Across the Pacific Northwest of North America, Pacific martens (Martes caurina) and American pine martens (Martes americana) are parapatric sister species with distinctive postglacial histories. Using mitochondrial DNA and 12 nuclear microsatellite loci, we examine processes of island colonization and anthropogenic introductions across 25 populations of martens. Along the North Pacific Coast (NPC), M. caurina is now found on only 2 islands, whereas M. americana occurs on mainland Alaska and British Columbia and multiple associated islands. Island populations of...
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Anthropogenic impacts such as habitat conversion and fragmentation, in combination with predator control and fur trapping, are responsible for substantial reductions in the ranges of many carnivores worldwide. The wolverine (Gulo gulo) is classified as vulnerable throughout the Holarctic Region by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, is designated as endangered in eastern Canada, and has been petitioned twice for listing with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. We examined genetic structure across populations in northwestern North America by using mtDNA sequences of the left domain of control region and the complete cytochrome-b gene (Cytb). Nucleotide diversity (π)...
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