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Center for Large Landscape Conservation

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This layer represents 5-year relative counts of wildlife carcasses collected by Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) maintenance personnel or U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Grizzly Bear Recovery Team personnel on or adjacent to on-system (major) routes from 2008 to 2012. To obtain relative counts, the 5-year total counts per mile, which included all wildlife species observed, were divided by the maximum observed calue (98) to give a relative 0-1 risk score. Total counts, which include all wildlife species observed, along with carnivore counts, which include only black bears, grizzly bears, mountain lions, and wolves, are provided. Counts were derived by identifying the nearest mile marker to each carcass point...
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This dataset was created by overlaying connectivity model outputs for grizzly bear, black bear, lynx, wolverine, forest specialist species, and forest biome dwellers where they intersect the region’s major roads. It was used in conjunction with future traffic volume projections to identify priority sites for mitigating road impacts on wildlife. This project investigated the potential impacts of future housing development on traffic to determine where increased traffic from housing development will impact habitat connectivity for large carnivores. The focus of this study was Flathead and Lincoln counties in northwestern Montana. The main goal was to maintain wildlife habitat connectivity across transportation corridors...
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These case study sites are detailed in the report accompanying this data layer. The case studies are intended to serve as examples of how some of the opportunities for diverse stakeholders to engage in the process of mitigating road impacts on wildlife that are described in the report might be applied on the ground, as well as other considerations that come into play in selecting sites for possible mitigation and designing mitigation solutions for those sites. Through these case studies, we illustrate potential opportunities for mitigation and partner engagement for each of the four alternative priority sets identified in this study.Wildlife carcasses recorded by Montana Department of Transportation, Idaho Department...
Categories: Data; Types: ArcGIS REST Map Service, ArcGIS Service Definition, Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service, Shapefile; Tags: AADT, AADT, Carnivores, Carnivores, Connectivity, All tags...
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In May 2014, the GNLCC Steering Committee approved two pilot projects explore approaches to landscape-scale coordination to enhance science-based management across the GNLCC. The two ‘Shared Landscape Outcomes’ pilots were designed to assess and focus on specific pairs of a GNLCC Goal and a priority landscape stressor (as defined in the Strategic Conservation Framework) and focus the approach at the entire GNLCC scale. The two pilot projects focused on (1) the Connectivity goal and Land Use Change stressor (described here) and (2) the Aquatic Integrity goal and Invasives stressor and (see: http://greatnorthernlcc.org/PTS/prj_report.html?PRJ_ID=403 )Connectivity Pilot:Wildlife species are becoming increasingly isolated...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Alberta, Aquatic Connectivity, British Columbia, Bull Trout, Cascadia, All tags...
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Establishing connections among natural landscapes is the most frequently recommended strategy for adapting management of natural resources in response to climate change. The U.S. Northern Rockies still support a full suite of native wildlife, and survival of these populations depends on connected landscapes. Connected landscapes support current migration and dispersal as well as future shifts in species ranges that will be necessary for species to adapt to our changing climate. Working in partnership with state and federal resource managers and private land trusts, we sought to: 1) understand how future climate change may alter habitat composition of landscapes expected to serve as important connections for wildlife,...
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