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Carla M. D'Antonio

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This data describes the coverage and composition of bryophytes and other ground cover within Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge on Hawaii Island. This study aims to evaluate the role of bryophytes in seedling recruitment and thus forest regeneration in different forest types. We compared bryophyte composition and coverage between tree species (Acacia koa and Metrosideros polymorpha) and forest types (intact forest and restoration forest) and then sampled native woody seedling recruitment in the bryophytes as well as other ground covers, such as leaf litter, bare soil, and exotic grass.
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This data release includes sampling locations for the coverage and composition of bryophytes, other ground cover and seedling abundance. All sites were within Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge on Hawaii Island. This study aims to evaluate the role of bryophytes in seedling recruitment and thus forest regeneration in different forest types. We compared bryophyte composition and coverage between tree species (Acacia koa and Metrosideros polymorpha) and forest types (intact forest and restoration forest) and then sampled native woody seedling recruitment in the bryophytes as well as other ground covers, such as leaf litter, bare soil, and exotic grass.
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Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites - grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Ecology Letters
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Humans and their ancestors are unique in being a fire-making species, but 'natural' (i.e. independent of humans) fires have an ancient, geological history on Earth. Natural fires have influenced biological evolution and global biogeochemical cycles, making fire integral to the functioning of some biomes. Globally, debate rages about the impact on ecosystems of prehistoric human-set fires, with views ranging from catastrophic to negligible. Understanding of the diversity of human fire regimes on Earth in the past, present and future remains rudimentary. It remains uncertain how humans have caused a departure from 'natural' background levels that vary with climate change. Available evidence shows that modern humans...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Journal of Biogeography
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This data release includes data and metadata on seedling abundance, composition, and rooting substrate within Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge on Hawaii Island. This study aims to evaluate the role of bryophytes in seedling recruitment and thus forest regeneration in different forest types. We compared bryophyte composition and coverage between tree species (Acacia koa and Metrosideros polymorpha) and forest types (intact forest and restoration forest) and then sampled native woody seedling recruitment in the bryophytes as well as other ground covers, such as leaf litter, bare soil, and exotic grass.
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