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California State Coastal Conservancy

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This case study includes representative macroinvertebrates that live in the marsh plain, its associated channels and pannes (ponds), and the marsh-upland transition zone. While less visible than animals such as birds, invertebrates play important roles in physical and biological processes (e.g., burrowing activity and channel bank erosion, and detritivores breaking down organic matter) and are important food resources for higher trophic animals. Common invertebrates in these habitats include plant-hopper (Prokelisia marginata), beach hopper (Traskorchestia traskiana), pygmy blue butterfly (Brephidium exilis), inchworm moth (Perizoma custodiata), western tanarthus beetle (Tanarthus occidentalis), salt marsh mosquitoes...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
2 matrices of existing climate change tools, the applicability of relevant tools for use in Southern California coastal wetlands, with information to help understand, choose, and use them, with guidance and sample outputs to help users incorporate them into their work. Will include updated information on the newest models. Two types of models: flood inundation and marsh accretion and habitat response. Audience: WRP Partner Agencies and stakeholders, other resource managers throughout Southern California, CA LCC and Partners.
Environmental Change Network: Current and Future Zonation PrioritizationZonation is a spatial conservation planning software tool that can take into account multiple species to create a hierarchical prioritization of the landscape. This is in contrast to other spatial conservation planning tools which may require predefined conservation targets or areas. Here, we used 199 California landbirds along with Zonation’s “core-area” algorithm to prioritize the California landscape. Species were weighted according to the California Bird Species of Special Concern criteria and probability of occurrence was discounted by distribution model and climate model uncertainty surfaces.The dataset provides priority areas for “current”...
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