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California Landscape Conservation Cooperative

Speaker: Dr. Jason Kreitler, USGSWednesday, October 24, 2012 -12:00pm to 1:00pmThis project is analyzing downscaled climate model data to assess the geography of climate change at scales relevant to actual conservation actions. This work analyzes the California Essential Habitat Connectivity products to determine which protected lands are most vulnerable and which of the proposed corridors would partially mitigate climate change threats.
Website: “Climate Change Refugia” website features a dynamic, interactive refugia map and all deliverables
This dataset contains monthly average hours of fog and low cloud cover (FLCC) per day for North and Central Coastal California. The set of 42 grids has one for each summer month (June, July, August, and September) for each year (1999 - 2009), except for 2 missing months (June 2001 and August 2006) . Grid cell values were calculated using eleven years of hourly, day and night, cloud maps derived from geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES) images collected and processed by the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA).For more information about this data and the Pacific Coastal Fog Project, see http://geography.wr.usgs.gov/fog (link is external) (link is external) and this article...
Kristin Byrd presented how this project aids conservation of California rangelands by identifying future integrated threats of climate change and land use change, and will quantify two main co-benefits of rangeland conservation – water supply and carbon sequestration. Through a multi-stakeholder partnership, the project proponents will develop integrated climate change/land use change scenarios for the Central Valley and Chaparral and Oak Woodland eco-regions, and disseminate information about future potential threats to high priority conservation areas within the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition (CRCC) study area, which includes the foothills around the Central Valley and most of the southern Inner Coast...
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