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Bureau of Land Management

FY2014One of the primary challenges facing public land managers in the Great Basin is identifying adaptation strategies to increase resiliency to climate change in an area that is already struggling with profound environmental challenges. Recent efforts to understand how the Great Basin weathered past droughts and climate variability may offer insight into approaches that could work in future decades. One approach to gather this information is to understand Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK). Gathering this information is challenging and requires an acknowledgment that much of this information is highly sensitive and proprietary. Translating this information into actionable management plans is even more challenging.This...
FY2014The goals for the project are1) Develop a Walker River Vision document which will include Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) of the traditional plants, wildlife, fish and water located on the reservation and traditional hunting/ gathering areas of the Agai Dicutta Numa (Walker River Paiutes) for use in future resource management planning and cultural sustainability..2) Develop a pilot project along the Walker River on the reservation by planting willows and other traditional plants to determine best practices for re-vegetation.This project will focus on GBLCC Goal 2: Focus science and management actions to sustain natural resources in the context of changing environmental conditions.The proposed project...
The article discusses a report published by the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) that examined the technical feasibility of using wind energy for electricity generation. The report assessed the costs, impacts and challenges associated with the production of 20% wind energy by 2030. Results have shown that there is a need for an enhanced transmission infrastructure and an increase in turbine installations to achieve 20% wind energy.
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The northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens) is a formerly abundant frog that has experienced significant declines across its range and is considered endangered in some parts of the range but still abundant in other parts of the range. Various factors have been invoked to explain population declines in the northern leopard frog, including habitat destruction, diseases, chemical contamination, acidification, increased ultraviolet light due to loss of the ozone layer, introduced predators, overcollecting, climatic changes, and general environmental degradation. However, no one cause has emerged as the primary factor behind population declines in any area. Probably, multiple causes contribute to population...
Categories: Publication; Tags: BLM, WLCI, WLCI Agency Report
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