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Anne Davidson

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The Gap Analysis Project (GAP) Analytical Database represents a synthesis of three core datasets for the conterminous U.S. Specifically 1) the GAP/LANDFIRE National Terrestrial Ecosystems_2011; 2) the Protected Areas Database of the United States (PAD-US) 1.4; and 3) the Species Ranges and Habitat Distribution Models for all terrestrial vertebrates. This database provides a mechanism to effiiently obtain summary statistics of those for a variety of spatial extents, including US states, US counties, Landscape Conservation Cooperation Network Areas, EPA's Level III-IV Ecoregions of the United States, and Level I-III Ecoregions of North America and 12-digit (6th level) hydrologic units. Disclaimer for Approved Database...
Tags: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, All tags...
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The Land Cover Data - Version 1.0 represents a highly thematically detailed land cover map of the U.S. The map legend includes types described by NatureServe's Ecological Systems Classification (Comer et al. 2002) as well as land use classes described in the National Land Cover Dataset 2001 (Homer et al. 2007). This version of the land cover data was used to support the Gap Analysis Project's vertebrate species modeling efforts. These data cover the entire continental U.S. and are a continuous data layer. These raster data have a 30 m x 30 m cell resolution. This land cover data set is considered official foundational data for the GAP species modeling process. The data have been made available provisionally to enhance...
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The Mission of the Gap Analysis Project (GAP) <http://gapanalysis.nbii.gov> is to promote conservation by providing broad geographic information on biological diversity to resource managers, planners, and policy makers who can use the information to make informed decisions. As part of the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) <http://www.nbii.gov>?a collaborative program to provide increased access to data and information on the nation?s biological resources--GAP data and analytical tools have been used in hundreds of applications: from basic research to comprehensive state wildlife plans; from educational projects in schools to ecoregional assessments of biodiversity. The challenge: keeping common...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: GAP Bulletin
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If conservation of biodiversity is the goal, then the protected areas network of the continental US may be one of our best conservation tools for safeguarding ecological systems (i.e., vegetation communities). We evaluated representation of ecological systems in the current protected areas network and found insufficient representation at three vegetation community levels within lower elevations and moderate to high productivity soils. We used national-level data for ecological systems and a protected areas database to explore alternative ways we might be able to increase representation of ecological systems within the continental US. By following one or more of these alternatives it may be possible to increase the...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: PLoS ONE
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The GAP National Terrestrial Ecosystems - Ver 3.0 is a 2011 update of the National Gap Analysis Project Land Cover Data - Version 2.2 for the conterminous U.S. The GAP National Terrestrial Ecosystems - Version 3.0 represents a highly thematically detailed land cover map of the U.S. The map legend includes types described by NatureServe's Ecological Systems Classification (Comer et al. 2002) as well as land use classes described in the National Land Cover Dataset 2011 (Homer et al. 2015). These data cover the entire continental U.S. and are a continuous data layer. These raster data have a 30 m x 30 m cell resolution. GAP used the best information available to create the land cover data; however GAP seeks to improve...
Categories: Data; Types: Map Service, OGC WMS Layer; Tags: Alabama, Alaska, Appalachian, Arizona, Arkansas, All tags...
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