Skip to main content

Amy Keister

A website with links to the Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) Integrated Data Management Network (IDMN) final report as well as individual LCC websites. The IDMN worked with over 20 organizations over two years to bring coherence to the LCC information management landscape. Specifically, the IDMN Network tried to address ways LCC partners implemented the basic building blocks of data management. Issues addressed included building and sharing science products with partners, securely storing those data for the long term, and evaluating ways to get those outputs to cooperators and eventually the public. Over the course of the IDMN project, the scope was expanded to address ways to track projects that produced...
Categories: Data, Web Site; Tags: Completed, DATA MANAGEMENT/DATA HANDLING, DATA MANAGEMENT/DATA HANDLING, DATA MANAGEMENT/DATA HANDLING, DATA MANAGEMENT/DATA HANDLING, All tags...
thumbnail
Draft Blueprint 2020The Blueprint is a living spatial plan for sustaining natural and cultural resources in the face of future change. It identifies opportunities for shared conservation action, prioritizing the lands and waters of the South Atlantic based on natural and cultural resource indicator models and a connectivity analysis. So far, more than 500 people from over 150 organizations have actively participated in developing the Blueprint. To learn more about the Blueprint, visit the Blueprint page.Priority CategoriesHighest priority for shared action: the most important areas for natural and cultural resources based on indicator condition. This class covers 10% of the South Atlantic geography.High priority...
thumbnail
This cultural resource indicator is an index of sites on the National Register of Historic Places surrounded by limited urban development. It identifies significant historic places that remain connected to their context in the natural world.Reason for SelectionLow-urban historic landscapes indicate significant cultural landscapes whose cultural context has been less impacted by urban growth. Cultural landscapes are “properties [that] represent the combined works of nature and of man” (UNESCO 2012). Reductions in natural habitat within these cultural landscapes reduce their overall historic and cultural value.Input DataThe National Register of Historic Places reflects what Americans value in their historic built...
thumbnail
This indicator represents the size of large, unfragmented patches of natural habitat. It identifies minimally disturbed natural areas at least 100 acres in size and greater than 200 meters wide.Reason for SelectionLarge areas of intact natural habitat are favorable for conservation of numerous species, including reptiles and amphibians, birds, and large mammals. The Esri Green Infrastructure data covers the entire United States and has been used in other broad-scale conservation planning efforts, so using this existing data helps align the Blueprint with other conservation efforts and reduce duplication of effort. We chose to use “Core Size (acres)” as the metric for this indicator. Other evaluation attributes included...
thumbnail
This indicator is an index based on the size of freshwater and saltwater marsh patches. Patch size thresholds are based on the habitat needs of four species of marsh birds.Reason for SelectionLarger, better connected wetlands are positively associated with fish (Meynecke et al. 2008), shrimp (Turner 1977), and marsh birds. In particular, seaside sparrow (Benoit and Askins 2002, Rush et al. 2009), saltmarsh sharp-tailed sparrow (Benoit and Askins 2002), and marsh wren (Rush et al. 2009) have been associated with marsh area effects. Other species are expected to be limited based on home range size. In addition, wave attenuation increases with wetland area (Shepard et al. 2011). Over time, a decrease in patch size...
View more...
ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.