Skip to main content

Alicia Torregrosa

This dataset contains monthly average hours of fog and low cloud cover (FLCC) per day for North and Central Coastal California. The set of 42 grids has one for each summer month (June, July, August, and September) for each year (1999 - 2009), except for 2 missing months (June 2001 and August 2006) . Grid cell values were calculated using eleven years of hourly, day and night, cloud maps derived from geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES) images collected and processed by the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA).For more information about this data and the Pacific Coastal Fog Project, see http://geography.wr.usgs.gov/fog (link is external) (link is external) and this article...
thumbnail
The rugged landscapes of northern Idaho and western Montana support biodiverse ecosystems, and provide a variety of natural resources and services for human communities. However, the benefits provided by these ecosystems may be at risk as changing climate magnifies existing stressors and allows new stressors to emerge. Preparation for and response to these potential changes can be most effectively addressed through multi-stakeholder partnerships, evaluating vulnerability of important resources to climate change, and developing response and preparation strategies for managing key natural resources in a changing world. This project supports climate-smart conservation and management across forests of northern Idaho...
thumbnail
Fog and low cloud cover (FLCC) changes the water, energy, and nutrient flux of coastal ecosystems. Easy-to-use FLCC data are needed to quantify the impacts of FLC on ecosystem dynamics during hot, dry Mediterranean climate summers. FLCC indices were generated from 26,000 hourly night and day FLCC maps derived from Geostationary Environmental Operational Satellite (GOES) data for June, July, August, and September, 1999- 2009 for coastal California, latitude 34.50°N, south of Monterey Bay, to latitude 41.95°N, north of Crescent City. Monthly FLCC average hours per day (h/d) range from < 2 to 18. Average FLCC over the ocean increases from north (9 h/d) to south (14 h/d) whereas FLCC over land is reversed. Over land,...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Earth and Space Science
thumbnail
Conservation efforts for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), hereafter sage-grouse, are underway across the range of this species. Over 70 local working groups have been established and are implementing on-the-ground sage-grouse oriented conservation projects. Early on in this process, the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG) recognized the need to join in these efforts and received funding from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) under the Candidate Species Conservation Program to help develop a species conservation plan for sage-grouse in the Mono County area. This conservation plan covers portions of Alpine, Mono, and Inyo counties in California and Douglas, Esmeralda, Lyon, and Mineral...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
BayGEO Journal Article by Alicia Torregrosa explaining the challenges of mapping fog and the techniques used to create the Fog and Low Cloud Cover map generated from GOES imagery. Karl the Fog is a twitter handle @KarlTheFog for fog watchers.Intro:Within the world of mapping, clouds are a pesky interference to be removed from satellite remote sensed imagery. However, to many of us, that is a waste of pixels. Cloud maps are becoming increasingly valuable in the quest to understand land cover change and surface processes. In coastal California, the dynamic summertime interactions between air masses, the ocean, and topography result in blankets of fog and low clouds flowing into low lying areas of the San Francisco...
View more...
ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.