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Person

Christopher E Schubert

Hydrologist

New York Water Science Center

Email: schubert@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 631-736-0783 x109
Fax: 631-736-4283
ORCID: 0000-0002-5137-1229

Location
Coram NY WSC Field Office
2045 Route 112
Bldg. 4
Coram , NY 11727
US

Supervisor: Robert F Breault
Studies of nearshore environmental health by the USGS focus on the interface between health and the environment, where interactions among people, the environment, and other living organisms affect the risk of toxicological and infectious disease. Understanding nearshore ecosystem health is complex, in part, because it is affected by a wide variety of environmental and anthropogenic stressors. The nearshore environment serves a variety of functions such as habitat for plants and animals as well as a variety of human activities. The introduction of contaminants can deteriorate these aquatic resources through degradation of ambient water quality. Contaminants introduced in this manner may accumulate in the sediments...
Scientific information, when reliably obtained and wisely applied, can strengthen our efforts to build resilient coastal communities before storms strike, and guide our response and recovery strategies after landfall. Documenting the height, extent, and timing of overland storm tide and wave dynamics across natural and man-made landscapes, is critical for improved storm-surge modeling for floodplain mapping and real-time forecasting. This leads to better planning, more effective early warning of storm-driven flooding, and strengthening of coastal resilience. The USGS Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics (SWaTH) Network developed for the Northeastern Atlantic coast provides critical information on nearshore storm...
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Problem The shallow groundwater of Nassau and Suffolk Counties is prone to contamination from current land-use, including agricultural, residential, and recreational. The aquifer system of Long Island is highly susceptible to human-derived contamination, in particular, because the soils and underlying sediments are generally composed of sandy, permeable materials that allow contaminants to move readily from the land surface into the groundwater below. Of increasing concern are the human-derived contaminants stemming from past and present uses of pesticides. In addition to the threat of direct runoff to adjacent waterbodies, pesticide transport through the shallow aquifer from inland sources may discharge to the...
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Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS) is located on the barrier island along the extreme southern shore of western and central Suffolk County, New York. Interspersed throughout FIIS are seventeen residential beach communities that in the summer months greatly increase in population due to the arrival of summer residents and vacationers. Wastewater from the numerous homes and businesses in the barrier island communities generally is discharged directly into the shallow ground-water system through use of private septic systems. Contaminants entering the ground-water system can pose a threat to coastal habitats, as they are transported by ground water that discharges to ocean and estuary shorelines. In October 2004,...
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Introduction Ongoing efforts to improve the health of New York's South Shore Estuary Reserve (SSER) require continuously recorded water-quality data to understand the short-term effects of stormwater runoff and other pollution sources. To document the diel and tidal variability of water quality in the western bays of the SSER, the USGS monitors select physical and chemical parameters at two sites within the SSER. One site, station 01310740 on Reynolds Channel at Point Lookout, is near the estuary mouth and operated in cooperation with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and Town of Hempstead Department of Conservation & Waterways. The second, station 01311143...
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