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Person

Walter J Sadinski

Research Ecologist

Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center

Email: wsadinski@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 608-781-6337
Fax: 608-783-6066
ORCID: 0000-0003-0839-8685

Location
UMESC - Laboratory/Office - #1
2630 Fanta Reed Road
La Crosse , WI 54603
US

Supervisor: Mark P Gaikowski
These data are associated with an article published in Global Ecology and Conservation (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gecco.2020.e01173) that describes climate's cascading effects on disease, predation, and hatching sucess in the Yosemite toad (Anaxyrus canorus). The Yosemite toad currently is federally listed as threatened under the U.S. Endanered Species Act based upon reported population declines and vulnerability to climate and other global-change factors. The species occurs only in California’s central Sierra Nevada at medium to sub-alpine elevations. Lands throughout its range largely are protected from development, but climate and other global-change factors potentially can limit populations.
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To describe calling activity of Pseudacris crucifer in relation to temperature, precipitation, and wetland water levels, we programmed an acoustic recorder (Wildlife Acoustics) to sample seasonal amphibian calls remotely at study site SC4DAI2 in the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway from 2008 to 2012. We programmed the recorder to sample for five minutes at the top of every hour of every day from late winter/early spring through late summer. We used the Songscape option in Songscope software to generate annual summaries of all of our acoustic samples from SC4DAI2. These summaries included a median dB level for each prescribed frequency within each recording. Pseudacris crucifer, the spring peeper, inhabited SC4DAI2...
We produced this data set as part of a larger, integrated study to assess the statuses of populations of Anaxyrus canorus and the causes of observed effects on fitness at field sites, primarily in Yosemite National Park near Tioga Pass, from 1996 to 2001. To assess and document the depths to the tops of individual A. canorus and Pseudacris regilla egg masses and to the sediments, we measured water depths at masses of both species. We used a meter stick to measure the depth (nearest mm) where female A. canorus deposited individual egg masses, and the distance from the water’s surface to the tops of those masses, at several breeding sites across 1996, 1998, 1999, and 2000. We did the same for egg masses of P. regilla...
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Since amphibian declines were first proposed as a global phenomenon over a quarter century ago, the conservation community has made little progress in halting or reversing these trends. The early search for a “smoking gun” was replaced with the expectation that declines are caused by multiple drivers. While field observations and experiments have identified factors leading to increased local extinction risk, evidence for effects of these drivers is lacking at large spatial scales. Here, we use observations of 389 time-series of 83 species and complexes from 61 study areas across North America to test the effects of 4 of the major hypothesized drivers of declines. While we find that local amphibian populations are...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
We produced this data set as part of a larger, integrated study to assess the statuses of populations of Anaxyrus canorus and the causes of observed effects on fitness at field sites, primarily in Yosemite National Park near Tioga Pass, from 1996 to 2001. ENCLOSURES We used field enclosures to test the hypothesis that exposure to ambient UV-B caused embryo mortality in 1996 and 1998. We covered the top of each enclosure with one or two types of thin plastic sheeting. One type was transparent to the solar spectrum. The other type filtered UV-B below 314 nm (UV-B<314) but was otherwise transparent to solar radiation. Laying both types together over the top of an enclosure did not alter the transmission characteristics...
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