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Person

Tonie E Rocke

Wildlife Biologist (Research)

National Wildlife Health Center

Email: trocke@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 608-270-2451
Fax: 608-270-2415
ORCID: 0000-0003-3933-1563

Location
6006 Schroeder Road
Madison , WI 53711-6223
US

Supervisor: David S Blehert
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These data were collected as part of a field trial to test the effectiveness of a sylvatic plague vaccine (see Rocke et al., 2017 for details). Vaccine and control plots were selected randomly from the available pairs at each location. Baits containing Rhodamine B, a biomarker, were distributed at each plot. At least 1 week and no more than 2 months post-baiting each year, local collaborators captured, marked, and sampled prairie dogs. Hair and whisker samples were collected from up to 50 unique prairie dogs from each plot each year. Sex, age, weight, and the identity of all current-year and prior-year recaptures were recorded for each captured animal. In the laboratory, hair/whiskers were assessed for the presence...
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In 2013, a large blinded, paired placebo-controlled field trial for the prairie dog oral sylvatic plague vaccine started in the Western US. On 17 paired plots, vaccine and placebo plots, small rodents were trapped annually for 3-5 consecutive nights (when weather allowed). Up on capture, we documented the trap numbers and the processed animals. We noted standard biological information (species, sex, age) and took samples (fleas, blood, hair and whiskers). When logistics allowed we also trapped diurnal animals. Hair and whisker samples were taped to a transparent sheet and scored for the presence (high dose 1, low dose 2) or absence (0) of Rhodamine B fluorescence (RB dataset)
In 2013, a large blinded, paired placebo-controlled field trial for the prairie dog oral sylvatic plague vaccine started in the Western US. On 17 paired plots, vaccine and placebo plots, small rodents were trapped annually for 3-5 consecutive nights (when weather allowed) and high elevation Utah plots where plague was active were more frequently trapped in 2014 and 2015. In the dataset the prevalence of flea infestation was recorded for the first annual summer sampling, it was summarized for all small rodent species caught and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). Infestations were either for all flea species collected or for Aetheca wagneri only (our most abundant flea species). We used this data to assess if plague...
These data were collected as part of a field trial to test the efficacy of a sylvatic plague vaccine (see Rocke et al., 2017 for details). Vaccine and control plots were selected randomly from the available sites at each location. At least 1 week and no more than 2 months post-baiting each year, local collaborators captured, marked and sampled prairie dogs for a minimum of 3 trap days. Both plots in a pair were trapped on the same day, and trap effort (number of traps and trap days) between plots of the same pair was similar with few exceptions. Fleas were collected from up to 50 unique prairie dogs from each plot each year. Sex, age, weight, and foot length were recorded for each captured animal. In the laboratory,...
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