Skip to main content

Person

Eben Paxton

Research Ecologist

Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center

Email: epaxton@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 808-985-6423
Fax: 808-967-8568
ORCID: 0000-0001-5578-7689

Location
PIERC Office Bldg 344
P.O. Box 44
Bldg. 344
Hawaii National Park , HI 96718
US

Supervisor: Gordon W Tribble
This data release includes data and metadata on 1) avian diet 2) seed rain 3) understory plant composition 4) seedling abundance and 5) sampling locations for these sites. In addition it includes data on seedling abundance, grass cover and light levels for a grass removal/seed addition experiment . All sites were within Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge on Hawaii Island. This study looked at multiple biotic interactions that potentially lead to self-reinforcing feedbacks within intact forest and degraded forest sites. Most of this study was done with sampling, however we also implemented an experiment in which we manipulated grass biomass and seed addition to specifically ask how these factors limit native...
This data release includes data and metadata on 1) avian diet 2) seed rain 3) understory plant composition 4) seedling abundance and 5) sampling locations for these sites. In addition it includes data on seedling abundance, grass cover and light levels for a grass removal/seed addition experiment . All sites were within Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge on Hawaii Island. This study looked at multiple biotic interactions that potentially lead to self-reinforcing feedbacks within intact forest and degraded forest sites. This data, in particular, focuses on the basal area of different species of fruiting plants within 20m of all of the seedrain traps.
thumbnail
Alala, or Hawaiian Crow (Corvus hawaiiensis), were extinct in the wild since the early 2000s. The first effort to reintroduce captive bred Alala back into the wild was conducted at Puu Makaala Natural Area Reserve on Hawaii Island. The 2017 release cohort were released in two stages and were the only Alala in the wild. Using automated radio telemetry tracking towers (n=4) that were distributed around the release area, we tracked the birds from September 26, 2017, to May 19, 2018, to document early exploratory movement of these birds in the wild.
thumbnail
This data release includes data and metadata on 1) avian diet 2) seed rain 3) understory plant composition 4) seedling abundance and 5) sampling locations for these sites. In addition it includes data on seedling abundance, grass cover and light levels for a grass removal/seed addition experiment . All sites were within Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge on Hawaii Island. This study looked at multiple biotic interactions that potentially lead to self-reinforcing feedbacks within intact forest and degraded forest sites.
thumbnail
The Hawaiian Islands are home to some of the world’s most culturally valuable but imperiled forest birds, including brightly colored native honeycreepers, many of which are threatened or endangered. One of the major threats these birds face is avian malaria, which is spread by a species of introduced mosquito and can have death rates exceeding 90 percent. For decades, upper mountain forests have provided refuge for Hawaiian forest birds because mosquitoes (and thus the disease) could not survive the cooler temperatures. However, warming associated with climate change could change this. Scientists used climate data and an epidemiological model to evaluate the future impacts of avian malaria on Hawaiian forest birds...
View more...
ScienceBase brings together the best information it can find about USGS researchers and offices to show connections to publications, projects, and data. We are still working to improve this process and information is by no means complete. If you don't see everything you know is associated with you, a colleague, or your office, please be patient while we work to connect the dots. Feel free to contact sciencebase@usgs.gov.