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Person

Dayle J Hoefling

Physical Scientist

Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Water Science Center

Email: dhoefling@usgs.gov
Office Phone: 614-430-7718
Fax: 614-430-7777
ORCID: 0000-0002-2004-3142

Location
Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana (Oki) Water Science Center
6460 Busch Boulevard
Suite 100
columbus , OH 43212
United States

Supervisor: Albert T Ruby
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Climatic data are from Daymet (Thornton and others, 2016) and include maximum daily air temperature and total daily precipitation on a 1-km resolution; these data replace and update the original climate data used for the tool (Williamson and others, 2009).
These orthophotos and digital surface model (DSM) were derived from low-altitude (approximately 92-m above ground surface) images collected from Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) flights over edge-of-field sites that are part of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) monitoring. The objective of this UAS photogrammetry data collection was to provide information on the tile-drain network in individual fields with the goal of understanding already observed patterns in runoff amount and water quality from these sites. A 3DR Solo quadcopter served as the flight vehicle, flights were pre-planned using Mission Planner, and flights were flown using Tower. Geospatial data were originally in WGS84...
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In 2009, the Kentucky Water Science Center completed the Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER-KY), which provided the ability to simulate streamflow for the period 1980-2000. This model integrated TOPMODEL (Beven and Kirkby, 1979) for pervious portions of the landscape with simulation of flow generated from impervious surfaces (USDA, 1986). Associated products included a flow-duration curve, load-duration curves when water-quality data were available, and general water balance. WATER-KY required a dedicated ArcGIS license with the Spatial Analyst extension, which made it difficult to use for some cooperators and limited integration with other hydrologic approaches. This new version translates...
These orthophotos and digital surface model (DSM) were derived from low-altitude (approximately 92-m above ground surface) images collected from Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) flights over edge-of-field sites that are part of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) monitoring. The objective of this UAS photogrammetry data collection was to provide information on the tile-drain network in individual fields with the goal of understanding already observed patterns in runoff amount and water quality from these sites. A 3DR Solo quadcopter served as the flight vehicle, flights were pre-planned using Mission Planner, and flights were flown using Tower. Geospatial data were originally in WGS84...
These orthophotos and digital surface model (DSM) were derived from low-altitude (approximately 92-m above ground surface) images collected from Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) flights over edge-of-field sites that are part of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) monitoring. The objective of this UAS photogrammetry data collection was to provide information on the tile-drain network in individual fields with the goal of understanding already observed patterns in runoff amount and water quality from these sites. A 3DR Solo quadcopter served as the flight vehicle, flights were pre-planned using Mission Planner, and flights were flown using Tower. Geospatial data were originally in WGS84...
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