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South Atlantic Water Science Center

South Atlantic Water Science Center
https://www.usgs.gov/centers/sa-water
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To address the data and information gap for characterizing coastal drought, a coastal salinity index (CSI) was developed using salinity data (Conrads 2016; Conrads and Darby, 2017). The CSI uses an approach similar to the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), a readily available drought index that is widely used for monitoring meteorological droughts (McKee and others, 1993). The CSI substitutes total monthly precipitation with monthly mean salinity data to determine the probability of recording a given salinity value in a particular month. The initial investigation demonstrated that the index could be used to delineate short- and long-term drought (saline) and wet (high freshwater inflow) conditions; however,...
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Actual evapotranspiration (ETa) values estimated for specified areas including 1) total county areas; 2) potentially irrigated areas within each county; and 3) mapped extents of irrigated lands within each county provided by some states. These ETa estimates were provided to the USGS National Water Use Science Project by the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center (Gabriel Senay and MacKenzie Friedrichs, written communication, 2/20/2017) and are based on 1-square kilometer resolution 2015 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data analyzed through the operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model using methods of Senay and others (2013). Reference: Senay,...
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The continental United States (CONUS) was modeled to produce simulations of historical and potential future streamflow using the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) application of the USGS National Hydrologic Model Infrastructure (NHMI; Regan and others, 2018). This child page specifically contains atmospheric forcings (daily minimum air temperature, daily maximum air temperature, and daily precipitation accumulation) from each of the global circulation models (GCMs) presented in table1_GCMs_used.csv, using the Representative Concentration Pathway 4.5 for simulating potential future streamflow for the period 2006 - 2100.
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To better understand the influence of human activities and natural processes on surface-water quality, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed the SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes) (Schwarz and others, 2006; Alexander and others, 2008) model. The framework is used to relate water-quality monitoring data to sources and watershed characteristics that affect the fate and transport of constituents to receiving surface-water bodies. The core of the model consists of using a nonlinear-regression equation to describe the non-conservative transport of contaminants from point and nonpoint sources on land to rivers, lakes and estuaries through the stream and river network. In North Carolina,...
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Freshwater salinization is an emerging issue for freshwater environments in the Chesapeake Bay, USA region. Salinization is often described by measurements of specific conductance (SC). This data release contains specific conductance observations collected by multiple regional agencies for streams within the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. This inventory compiles and harmonizes data from the Water Quality Portal (WQP), which is a data repository developed by the National Water Quality Monitoring Council and supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Geological Survey, and the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System (NWIS). Both discrete measures of SC, which are single measures taken...
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