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Michael T Moreo

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Note: This data release has been revised. Find version 2.0 here: https://doi.org/10.5066/F75H7FH3. Groundwater withdrawal estimates from 1913-2010 for the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS) are compiled in a Microsoft® Access database. This database updates two previously published databases (Moreo and others, 2003; Moreo and Justet, 2008). A total of about 38,000 acre-feet of groundwater was withdrawn from the DVRFS in 2010, of which 47 percent was used for irrigation, 22 percent for domestic, and 31 percent for public supply, commercial, and mining activities. The updated database was compiled to support ongoing efforts to model groundwater flow in the DVRFS. References cited: Moreo, M.T.,...
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Selected evapotranspiration data were collected from 7/5/2011 to 1/1/2017 at the Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS, https://nevada.usgs.gov/adrs/) in support of ongoing research to improve the understanding of hydrologic and contaminant-transport processes in arid environments. The data presented in this data release includes 30-minute and daily evapotranspiration and associated energy-balance fluxes, precipitation, soil water content, air and soil temperature, wind speed and direction, humidity, and photosynthetically active radiation. Data methods follow those described in Moreo and others (2017). This is the third in a series of three releases of evapotranspiration data, which has been measured continuously...
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This data release (version 2.0, July 2021) consists of a Microsoft® Access database that contains groundwater withdrawal estimates from 1913 to 2016 for the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS). The four tables in the database also are provided as individual comma-separated values (CSV) files. This version (2.0) of the data release contains the most current version of the database and supersedes all previous versions. A total of about 41,000 acre-ft of groundwater were withdrawn from DVRFS in 2016 of which 51 percent was used for irrigation, 20 percent for domestic, and 27 percent for public supply, commercial, and mining activities. The total groundwater withdrawals for Pahrump Valley (hydrographic...
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This USGS data release represents supplemental tabular data for an annual groundwater discharge by evapotranspiration (ET) from areas of spring-fed riparian vegetation, Stump Spring and Hiko Springs, Clark County, Nevada, 2016-18. The raw ET dataset contained multiple data gaps that were simulated and gap-filled with the water-level model utility in SeriesSEE, a USGS developed Microsoft Excel® addin. Continuous time-series data, including net radiation, sensible-heat flux, latent-heat flux, and ground-heat flux, from before and after the data gap(s) were used to simulate turbulent fluxes with multivariate regressions and the gramma transform, used for latent heat gaps after precipitation events. ET data were gap...
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This data release consists of a Microsoft® Access database that contains groundwater withdrawal estimates from known and approximate well locations (withdrawal points) in the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS) to support a regional, three-dimensional, transient groundwater flow model (Belcher and others, 2017; Halford and Jackson, 2020). The database provides information for each withdrawal point including estimated location and completion interval (Moreo and others, 2003). Groundwater withdrawal estimates for each withdrawal point have been compiled by water use and year. Uncertainty was assigned to the annual withdrawal values based on the use and method of estimation (Moreo and others, 2003)....
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