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Joanna Whittier

Fishes of the Upper Colorado River Basin have one of the highest levels of endemism in the United States. The range and abundance of these fish has declined over the last century and continues to decline as a result of legacy impacts from past management practices, current water management, interactions with non-natives, and other impacts. Seven of these fish are considered imperiled by the American Fisheries Society and four are listed as endangered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. We applied a complementarity-based approach to develop priority ranks (0 – 1; low to high) for catchments in the Upper Colorado River Basin. We used methods and a framework that we had previously developed for the Lower Colorado...
Human impacts occurring throughout the Northeast and Midwest United States, including urbanization, agriculture, and dams, have multiple effects on the region’s streams which support economically valuable stream fishes. Changes in climate are expected to lead to additional impacts in stream habitats and fish assemblages in multiple ways, including changing stream water temperatures. To manage streams for current impacts and future changes, managers need region-wide information for decision-making and developing proactive management strategies. Our project met that need by integrating results of a current condition assessment of stream habitats based on fish response to human land use, water quality impairment,...
Abstract (from Springer): Globally, changing fire regimes due to climate is one of the greatest threats to ecosystems and society. In this paper, we present projections of future fire probability for the southcentral USA using downscaled climate projections and the Physical Chemistry Fire Frequency Model (PC2FM). Future fire probability is projected to both increase and decrease across the study region of Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Texas. Among all end-of-century projections, change in fire probabilities (CFPs) range from − 51 to + 240%. Greatest absolute increases in fire probability are shown for areas within the range of approximately 75 to 160 cm mean annual precipitation (MAP), regardless of climate model. Although...
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This data set provides the results of a conservation prioritization analysis for wadeable streams in Missouri, USA. Higher values (Maximum of 1) represent higher conservation value. Conservation values were derived using Zonation conservation planning software which used species distribution models, a prioritization algorithm (either Core-Area or Additive Benefit), species weighting (None, Vulnerability, or Listing Status), connecitivity (Yes or No), and masks representing different conservation networks (None, Priority Watersheds, Conservation Opportunity Areas, and Existing Conservation Network). For more information see "An Assessment of Stream Fish Vulnerability and an Evaluation of Conservation Networks in...
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